mal200x267In the battles between lawyers and doctors over malpractice lawsuits filed by patients harmed while seeking medical services, it may be worth heeding economists’ prescription for caregivers: Physicians, heal thy selves.

Aaron Carroll, a pediatrician and health policy expert at Indiana University, has written in the “Upshot” column of the New York Times that research shows that so-called tort “reforms”—including current initiatives on medical malpractice by the Republican-controlled Congress—may be misguided.

That’s because advocates committed to greater patient safety and improved care may find more impressive results on the medical not the legal side of “reforms,” Carroll argues. He points to persuasive data from Florida and Texas hospitals and how they fare with lawsuits and their rankings with Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs).

D-vitaminsThe health care pendulum appears to have taken a bad swing to the extreme with vitamin D.  Too many Americans may be taking unnecessary tests to see if they’re deficient of this important nutrient. Too many of us are taking unneeded amounts of it.

Federal experts report that blood tests for vitamin D among Medicare beneficiaries, most 65 and older, increased 83-fold from 2000 to 2010. Testing rates rose 2.5-fold from 2009 to 2014 among those with commercial insurance.  Among a recent sample of 800,000 patients in Maine, nearly one in five had at least one test for blood levels of the vitamin over a three-year period. More than a third got two or more tests, often for vague complaints like malaise or fatigue. Labs and doctors are telling patients who have undergone tests and who have readings in the normal range of 20 to 30 nanograms of the vitamin per milliliter of blood that they suffer a deficiency.

This all is leading to what some experts are terming a “pandemic” of over-testing, faulty diagnosis, and excess consumption of a nutrient, based on sparse evidence and misplaced belief that, as the New York Times reports, “vitamin D can help turn back depression, fatigue, and muscle weakness, even heart disease or cancer. In fact, there has never been widely accepted evidence that vitamin D is helpful in preventing or treating any of those conditions.”

Prostate-e1492269148971-483x1024A burst of bad headlines and not so great news reports may have confused some men. But to put it in lay terms:  The use of the common test for routine prostate cancer screening got a dim grade of C for many men, up from a dismal D, in a re-evaluation by independent experts who assess the nation’s preventive medical services.

That blunt review of regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, despite some reports to the contrary, keeps with how the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPTF) looked at annual  screening for this most common form of cancer for men when it issued its first guidelines in 2012, notes healthnewsreview.org.

The health information site says the USPTF earlier had surprised many, downgrading routine prostate cancer screening to a D, and noting, “There is moderate or high certainty that the service has no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits.” It now says it rates a C for many men younger than 70, meaning physicians should “Offer or provide this service for selected patients depending on individual circumstances,” and that “There is at least moderate certainty that the net benefit is small.”

defib-st-judeThe serious, slowly disclosed problems of a manufacturer and its implanted heart defibrillators may offer more needed cautions to Food and Drug Administration critics who want regulators to rush the oversight of drug and medical device makers and make the agency more welcoming to big business.

St. Jude Medical, the New York Times has reported, has received a written rebuke that the FDA has hit the wall with the company and wants it to deal with its product problems. The agency says it is fed up because the company has dawdled for years in letting patients, as well as its senior management and medical advisory board know that it long has experienced major woes with its heart devices batteries.

St. Jude has been forced to issue recall notices on hundreds of thousands of its defibrillators. Hundreds of cases have been reported in which their batteries died unexpectedly. Dozens of patients have suffered “adverse effects,” and at least two deaths have been attributed to device failures.

end-of-life-800-300x198Many hospitals and doctors rightly have campaigned to get more patients to provide information in advance about their end-of-life care choices, but doesn’t that mean that the choices when made should be respected? And if they’re not, what role do the courts have?

Paula Span, a New York Times columnist who writes on aging issues, reports that a growing number of patients and families have sued hospitals, doctors, and nurses for disregarding or overriding advance directives. There are various kinds of these legal documents. But they often become part of patients’ medical records, directing caregivers, for example, that an individual does not want extreme measures taken to resuscitate them or to sustain their lives.

This can go against deep traditions in medicine, especially for caregivers accustomed to crisis responses in difficult, exigent circumstances. They think of themselves as life changers and life savers. At the same time, patients have insisted that their rights and choices demand respect. Many physicians and hospitals have recognized and encouraged this, as has the U.S. health care system more generally, for example, via Medicare.

http://www.protectpatientsblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/69/2017/04/hpv-vaccine-uptake-infographic.__v100248120-216x300.jpgMore Americans ages 18 to 59 may be infected with the human papilloma virus (HPV) than previously had been known, with 1 in 4 men and 1 in 5 women carrying high-risk strains, federal experts say.

The new findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may become a key part of campaigns to get more parents to vaccinate youngsters against HPV infections. They have been found to cause cervical cancer and have been tied to cancers of the throat, anus, and male and female reproductive organs.

HPV-related cancers are on the rise, and it is concerning that the CDC found that almost half of Americans’ are infected. But public health leaders have confronted ignorance and adult prudery—by physicians, public officials, and parents—as they try to get boys and girls, ages 11 and 12, inoculated and protected against the virus.

codes-300x220Hospital care accounts for a third of the nation’s $3 trillion in annual spending for medical services. And not only are these charges increasing—and driving up health costs—they’re infuriating patients and their families. Who can make heads or tails of hospital bills? And if consumers do, will they discover billing practices that only anger them more?

Elizabeth Rosenthal, a seasoned journalist, accomplished medical correspondent, and a non-practicing doctor, has created a stir with “An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back.” It’s her new best-seller, and was excerpted recently in the New York Times Magazine.

The book and magazine story delve, in part, into the sausage-making aspects of medical billing. These systems have enslaved American health care. They turn on bulky, balky coding systems that provide a short-hand summary for every therapy that patients receive from providers—physicians and hospitals. In turn, payers—patients, insurers, and Uncle Sam—rely on the codes to determine fees they will fork over for services and materials. In between are platoons of coders and billing experts for payers and providers, warring over ever number and the money they represent.

23andMetest-300x229Federal regulators have reversed themselves and approved a company’s controversial plan to sell direct to customers saliva-based tests that can predict their genetic risk for diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

Officials of the federal Food and Drug Administration emphasized that the tests cannot show conclusively if individuals will develop conditions for which they may have genetic risk. They said any health test results should be discussed fully with doctors.

The FDA said it would keep close tabs on the online-order products of  23andMe, which previously had sought to market its saliva tests not only for consumers’ genealogies but also for their health interests. The FDA slapped down the firm’s first foray into health measurements:  23andMe in 2013 had charged $99 for a test that it claimed gave information, genetic and otherwise, on 240 conditions and traits. Regulators halted those tests, requiring 23andMe and others in the field  to prove their products’ accuracy and to clarify that users understood what they were paying for and any test data.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information