Articles Posted in Research Studies

NaitoRon Naito already had been rebuffed by one specialist about the severity of his illness. He was awaiting in a doctor’s examining room for his lab test results and a consultation with a second expert about his already advanced cancer. What happened next stunned the Portland, Ore., resident. But now he’s doing something to help other patients in this way too common situation.

Naito overheard his doctor and a medical student talking about him and his lab results as they passed by the open room door, saying a tumor in his pancreas was “5 centimeters,” and was “very bad.”

That was the way Naito, who has practiced as an internist for 40 years, learned his condition was terminal. The cruel delivery of that crucial news convinced him that he needed to spend what time he has left working with his medical colleagues about their communication skills, especially in conveying the news to patients that they are dying.

lyrica-300x248Patients’ struggles with medical pain are a major problem. So, too, is the proclivity of Big Pharma, doctors, hospitals, insurers, and many others to respond to pain not only by pushing more prescription pills but also by overstating their benefits and downplaying their costs and potential harms.

As the nation grapples with an opioid painkiller crisis, New York Times columnist Jane E. Brody deserves credit for drilling down on gabapentin, “taken by millions of patients despite little or no evidence that it can relieve their pain.”

The drug won approval from the federal Food and Drug Administration a quarter century ago for treatment of seizure disorders. But it since has become a go-to medication for doctors who write “off-label” prescriptions for it to care for “all kinds of pain, acute and chronic, in addition to hot flashes, chronic cough and a host of other medical problems,” Brody wrote.

hospitalpricebystaterand-300x185Big businesses, which beat on their employees to be more cost-conscious, efficient, and productive, may need to take a page out of their own books if they hope to better control the soaring health care costs that they’re also shoving off onto their workers.

That’s a key takeaway from new research by the independent, nonprofit RAND Corporation into prices paid in 25 states to 70 hospital systems by job-provided health insurers in 2017. They provide coverage for most Americans, more than 180 million of us, and RAND found that private employer-sponsored health plans paid hospitals on average twice or even three times as much as Uncle Sam did through the Medicare program for the same services at the same hospitals.

Hospitals bellyache about tight-fisted Medicare prices that Uncle Sam can negotiate due to big dollars and huge number of patients covered under its senior health care plan. Although hospitals call the government-negotiated prices too low and an unfair benchmark, they provide realistic insights into hospitals’ bottom-line charges in what is one of the biggest areas of Americans’ health care costs. As RAND researcher Christopher Whaley told Modern Healthcare, an industry-covering news organization:

Spending’s askew when billions go for unproven surgical robots while lack of affordable care leads thousands of poor, black, and brown patients to need diabetic amputations

amputations-300x171If U.S. health care leaders look ahead to 2020 and wonder why their sector of the economy will be one of the key concerns of presidential candidates and voters, they can only blame themselves for allowing the public to conclude that the industry’s big money and big profit drives have gone haywire.

allergy-300x200If residents of the nation’s capital aren’t already sneezing, hacking, and swiping at red and rheumy eyes, just wait — the spring allergy season is upon us. And it may be longer and worse than ever. Then, Washingtonians also may be gasping soon for another reason: worsening air pollution, specifically problematic ozone levels in summer heat.

Though science deniers may be resisting environmental realities, human-caused climate change already is affecting our health and well-being.

Air pollution, for example, is a rising worry, the American Lung Association reported in its 20th annual report on clean air. The health group advised that:

asstdcareunaffordable-300x188As the nation rapidly grays and income disparities widen by the day, a sizable number of Americans — a group that built the nation to greatness and has been its economic bedrock — is headed to yet another ugly indignity: More than half of middle-income seniors won’t be able to afford their medical expenses and the cost of assisted housing they will need at age 75 and older.

New research published in the journal “Health Affairs” has projected what already soaring medical and housing costs will mean to those whose incomes fall between $25,001 to $74,298 per year and are ages 75 to 84. These middle-income elders will increase in number from 7.9 million now to 14.4 million by 2029 and soon will be 43% or the biggest share of American seniors.

But the picture for them and their finances, housing, and medical expenses may be glum. Projections show they will lack the money, even if experts calculate in their home equity, to afford assisted living they may need in their late years.

calesthenicsjpnse-300x169Even as American corporations twist themselves into pretzel shapes to persuade shareholders of their devotion to maximizing profits, why are they throwing an estimated $8 billion annually at workplace wellness programs that, according to a growing body of evidence, don’t work?

The zeal for wellness programs — which aim to get workers to exercise, lose weight, avoid smoking, drink in moderation, and stress less — is just one more flashing red indicator of political risks as companies grow more desperate to restrain skyrocketing health care costs.

Due to their post-World War II decisions to compete for workers in a fast rebuilding U.S. economy, companies long have been the go-to source for Americans’ health insurance: In exchange for a quarter of trillion dollars in federal tax subsidies, employers provide more than half of nonelderly U.S. workers — 152 million of us — workplace health coverage.

mouse-300x169James Heathers is a Ph.D. with expertise in scientific methods and data. He works in a behavioral science lab at Northeastern University in Boston. He’s young, adaptive, and savvy enough to participate in social media, especially Twitter. There, he saw a problem and a challenge with the way medical scientific findings get presented to sizable audiences online.

As someone accustomed to dealing with academic and scientific rigor, he paused and thought he could title his planned effort, “handling the translational gap during the science media transition.” But this Aussie has a sense of humor—and he wanted impact. He thought a straight-laced approach would be as “popular as cabbage sandwiches.”

So, instead, he focused in on a broad number of reputable studies that he thinks get misrepresented and grab unjustified popular attention. This research involves the extrapolation of early results in animal tests, making them sound — incorrectly — as if they instantly have meaning for people. He created a Twitter account that is garnering lots of attention, including tens of thousands of unexpected followers.

AmProgressBIRcosts-300x245When patients battle with the desperate extremes of a disease like a fast-spreading cancer, it isn’t just the radiation and chemo therapies that sap their spirits, there’s a  demoralizing runner-up concern: The constant battling with doctors, hospitals, and insurers over medical bills.

Medical billing and insurance-related costs are so over the top that they pile up a half-trillion-dollars a year in burdensome administrative costs — half of which is excessive and wasteful, according to new research from the Center for American Progress, a left-leaning think tank.

The center reviewed past studies of administrative costs in U.S. health care, seeking to address criticisms of their methods and conclusions. Still, the new findings raise points that may stagger patients, policy makers, and politicians, say Emily Gee, a health economist for the group, and Topher Spiro, its vice president for Health Policy and a senior economic fellow.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information