Articles Posted in Medications

chriscollins-300x201At a time when prescription drug prices keep skyrocketing and Americans pay hundreds of billions of dollars for medications that account for as much as 15 percent of all U.S. health care spending, federal law enforcers provided a rare and jarring sight with the public arrest of a congressman on charges he engaged in insider trading involving an Australian drug maker.

Chris Collins, a Republican who represents a western New York district and was among President Trump’s earliest and most vocal supporters in Congress, insists he committed no wrong. He says he will be exonerated, but he has pulled the plug on his plans to seek reelection in November.

The sordid details of his financial dealings, as laid out in news stories and a damning indictment, however, may keep front and center not only the charges against him but also troubling questions about members of Congress and their private investing, corporate board roles, and especially their tenacity as Big Pharma lapdogs, instead of being watchdogs on behalf of besieged, too often bankrupted American patient-consumers.

cdc-opi-aug-300x227When Big Pharma pursues rapacious profits and regulators snooze, patients suffer terrible consequences, as new revelations about the opioid crisis show.

Kaiser Health News Service , via the Washington Post, and The New York Times both have done excellent investigative digging into drug makers’ role in fueling the prescription painkiller mess that authorities estimate claims 116 lives a day due to overdoses.

Fred Schulte, writing for the independent, nonpartisan Kaiser service, reported that rival makers — seeing how much money Purdue Pharma was making with its powerful and addictive OxyContin drug and that it was encountering law enforcement and regulatory challenges — stepped in with “similarly dangerous painkillers, such as fentanyl, morphine and methadone.”

debtyoungmed-300x177Big Data may be a business buzzword that puts most consumers into a big sleep, but big alarms are sounding for Americans about Big Brother intrusions into their lives via the collection and analysis of vast amounts of highly personal information. Of course, Big Pharma and medical insurers are at the fore of invasive practices — some of which patient-consumers themselves are helping, likely without knowing they’re doing so.

Millions of Americans may be little aware, for example, that they’re now working for GlaxoSmithKline, a global pharmaceutical conglomerate with $9 billion in revenues in just the most recent quarter. GSK just struck a $300-million deal with 23andMe, the company that has persuaded roughly 5 million consumers to spit in a test tube to get a glimpse of their genetic information, notably information about their ancestry and purportedly some of their genomic health risks.

Firms like 23andMe, with promotions at events like Baltimore Ravens pro football games, also have amassed highly personal genetic and medical data on millions of patient-consumers, promising to protect the information but also offering, casually and by the way, that this vital information could be shared — ostensibly for the betterment of public health.

cpidrugs-300x182Uncle Sam long has allowed states to set the rules governing how Medicaid works, and a dozen or so of them have decided, with the purported goal of increased fiscal rectitude, to impose harsh rules to force poor, sick, disabled, and aged program participants to work more or to seek employment.

But taxpayers might be better served if the frugal-minded turned greater attention to Big Pharma’s insidious role at the state level in causing Medicaid costs to skyrocket, threatening budgets and creating conflicts in funding other public programs like education and transportation.

The Center for Public Integrity (CPI) and National Public Radio deserve praise for investigating how corruptive, drug-maker money has overwhelmed state officials’ efforts to corral soaring costs of prescription medications covered by Medicaid and governed by a patchwork of rules in each of the nation’s 50 states.

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Americans should be wary lest they get in between Big Pharma and a buck.

That’s what investigators for a U.S. Senate subcommittee showed when scrutinizing how industry middlemen inundated the Show Me State with more than a billion doses of powerful prescription painkillers, making big profits but asking few questions how so many opioid drugs could be taken by so few patients.

It’s also what patients might see as drug makers retreat from research to develop needed new antibiotics and therapies for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

SCImaginvestigation-300x147The federal Food and Drug Administration has turned a blind eye to tens of millions of dollars paid by Big Pharma to doctors who play crucial roles in advising the nation’s prescription drug watchdog on the safety and effectiveness of medications sold for billions of dollars annually to the American public.

Science magazine deserves credit for its investigation of conflicts of interest it found by examining readily available public records on payments received by more than 100 physician advisers to the FDA over a four-year period.

Reporter Charles Piller and graphics editor Jia  You took an important and different look at records, scrutinizing doctors disclosed drug company funding after their service on elite panels that assist FDA staff in the review and approval of products before they can go to market. Under fire by drug safety and other public advocates, and with intense peer pressure, doctors — grudgingly — have come to accept the notion that they should avoid conflicts of interest before sitting on such influential oversight groups.

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As the nation struggles through the “100 deadliest days,” the summer season of medical traumas, hospitals are warning anew that they’re not faring well in their constant battles to stock drugs that patients need for their care, notably in emergency rooms.

The New York Times reported that ERs across the country can’t find and keep sufficient supplies of vital medications, ranging from “morphine, which is used to ease the pain of injuries like broken bones [to] diltiazem, a heart drug.” And said the newspaper story:

Hospitals small and large have been scrambling to come up with alternatives to these standbys, with doctors and nurses dismayed to find that some patients must suffer through pain, or risk unusual reactions to alternative drugs that aren’t the best option.

nuplazid-300x169Big Pharma has thrown a billion-dollar biscuit at the nation’s prescription drug watchdog, and with the admirable goal of possibly getting sick Americans faster pharmaceutical help, the federal Food and Drug Administration may be rushing risky, unsafe medications to market.

ProPublica, the Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative site, has posted a deep dig into the increasing warning signs that the FDA may be on a dangerous track with its plan to answer rightful criticisms that the agency for too long was too pokey in reviewing and approving prescription drugs for sale in the United States.

But the agency may be putting patients at grave risk with its plans to step on the gas, including allowing drug makers to pay for costs of reviews in exchange for ensuring they will be speedy. Big Pharma has forked over $905 million in 2017 — 75 percent of the agency budget for scientific reviews of branded and generic drugs — as compared with 27 percent funding in 1993.

breconstruct-300x200Cancer and surgery — it’s little wonder that even the most resilient patients can buckle a bit when their doctors talk to them about these two issues together and urgently. That’s why new research may be  valuable to women with breast cancer, providing them with better evidence-based insight about challenges in their reconstructive options.

The information, which experts said surprised them and may change their views on frequently performed procedures, yet again underscores that surgery can carry significant risks and complications.

In fact, 1 in 3 women who undergo cancer-related breast reconstructive surgery develops a postoperative complication over the next two years, 1 in 5 requires more surgery, and in 1 in 20 of cases, reconstruction fails, the New York Times reported of the published findings of medical researchers, most from the University of Michigan.

reiner1-300x93Americans who are poor, middle-class, chronically or mentally ill, disabled, frail, elderly and young — most of us, really — may need to keep our fingers crossed  that the relentless attacks on health care access fail again.

reiner2-300x84Partisans who don’t get the concept of health care as a right have opened many fronts and are especially active of late, with proposed bureaucratic re-alignments of the federal government, promotion of “skinny” or junk health insurance plans, and efforts to slash support for public programs that boost the health of tens of millions through Medicaid, Medicare, food aid, and health coverage for kids of the working poor.

reiner3-300x113If you’re working and get your health insurance through your job, as most Americans do, you shouldn’t think that you and yours will be magically exempted from  Republicans’ hammering at the U.S. health care system.

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