ohio-300x185With more than 4,000 overdose deaths last year alone and a fifth of its residents having received prescriptions for powerful painkillers, the state of Ohio has sued five Big Pharma companies, accusing them of mispresenting opioid drugs’ risks and fueling the medications’ epidemic abuse.

Ohio joins Mississippi in suing makers of increasingly lethal drugs like OxyContin and Percocet, whose addictive nature was hidden and downplayed by Big Pharma, critics say. The abuse of prescription opioids has fueled heroin use, with 33,000 Americans dying last year alone due to overdoses, federal and state health and law enforcement officials have said.

Fatal drug overdoses now exceed gun- or vehicle-deaths and they are matching the terrible tolls exacted at the height of the HIV-AIDS pandemic. Heartland America, and particularly white men, have been hard hit by the opioid drug crisis, with Ohio, Kentucky, New Hampshire and West Virginia recording the nation’s highest numbers of overdose deaths.

clockYour time is precious, and when you are a patient, you may feel it’s more so, especially if you’re ill or even in the end stage of your life.

So why do health care providers keep us waiting, or worse, why must doctors and hospitals act downright oblivious to how valuable our time might be as opposed to theirs—and what might be done about it?

Take a look at a thoughtful piece on how one health system has tried to keep true to the idea that patients matter above everything else and the delivery of care needs to focus on them:

embarrass-300x172Health news readers look out: media organizations seem to be struggling with an outbreak of the whoopsies—as in, “Whoopsie, if we had more sense, we wouldn’t have put out the story you just read.”

The flare-up of embarrassing content, as chronicled well by the Healthnewsreview.org, a health information watchdog site, also seems to be a double problem for some media outlets that ironically have just warned their audiences about fake news.

As always, the dubious, low-value information concentrates on diet and nutrition topics — for instance, that small amounts of alcohol or coffee sway cancer risk or that eating chocolate makes your heart beat more regularly.

kid-belts-300x300Keeping kids safe is a constant challenge. Here are some new cautions from recent news reports:

Seat belts save lives—if used, and correctly

Although seat belts can be big lifesavers and a major way to protect passengers from injury, they don’t work if they’re not used—and correctly—especially with children. More than 4 in 10 youngsters killed in vehicular crashes between 2010 and 2014 were improperly restrained, particularly in vehicles’ front seat, or they weren’t buckled in at all, researchers found after studying National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data.

Blausen_0601_LaparoscopicGastricBanding-300x300They once got a ton of hype with radio, TV, and print ads, as well as billboard campaigns by proponents who later proved to be nothing less than sketchy. But the much-touted lap-band weight surgeries have fallen out of favor. The number of the procedures performed annually has nose-dived.

Researchers, based on a longer view, are finding that, among bariatric weight-loss options, lap-band surgeries offer some of the poorest results and result in frequent added procedures—at big costs, both economic and to disappointed, suffering patients.

Vox, the online news site, deserves credit for pulling together a painful review of what once was the most common way for overweight Americans, mostly women, to tackle one of the nation’s epidemic conditions: obesity.

hopkins-300x240It long has been a controversial bit of conventional wisdom. But big teaching hospitals may be a better place for older, sicker patients to go for care, a new study finds. They also may pay more for the treatment, as these institutions have become so large, bureaucratic, and revenue oriented.

Researchers at Harvard and hospitals in the Boston area published an observational study of 21 million Medicare hospitalizations, finding older, sicker patients had better 30- and 90-day mortality rates in 250 major teaching hospitals as compared with 894 institutions with minor teaching roles and 3,339 nonteaching hospitals.

When adjusting for factors that might affect results, the percentage of patients who died within 30 days of hospitalization—one quality measure— was 8.3 percent at major teaching hospitals, versus 9.2 percent at minor teaching hospitals and 9.5 percent at non-teaching hospitals, Stat, the online health information site has reported. That data means one fewer patient dies for every 83 the teaching hospitals treat.

mitchPresident Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress haven’t repealed the Affordable Care Act. Yet.

Still, analyses show how, as one critic said, the GOP plans a big move of federal money from “health to wealth”—to take support from the poor and middle class, especially from the very voters who put Trump in office, to finance a $1 trillion tax cut for the rich, Big Pharma, medical device makers, and, yes, operators of tanning salons.

There’s been a huge amount of press coverage, but look at some key health care numbers—from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, the White House, and health policy experts— and see if this motivates you to get in touch with your elected officials:

Diverse_doctors_3-300x201Some new research studies suggest ways to find a good doctor by focusing on demographics. Older doctors who have reduced their caseloads may not be an optimal choice, one study suggests, while another finds that, for seniors sick enough to be hospitalized, women MDs excel. And doctors who are immigrants can be solid patient choices, a third study reports.

Let’s be clear: These studies are observational, and they focus on select measures of care. But they are based on big data, analyses of hundreds of thousands and even millions of cases. Your own individual experience with a clinician counts a ton, and must never be ignored. A doctor with a brilliant resume, golden accomplishments, and a sterling reputation can still treat you badly, even blunder with your care.

Still, after examining three years of data on more than 700,000 admissions and the outcomes of 19,000 doctors, researchers from Harvard Medical School and prominent Boston-area hospitals found that as MDs aged, mortality rates of their hospitalized patients climbed. For doctors younger than 40, the rate was 10.8 percent, while for those older than 60, it hit 12 percent.

Polycythemia vera is so rare that just under 3 or so per 100,000 American men, most older than 60, are diagnosed each year with this rare form of blood cancer. Pseudobulbar affect, or PBA, is an uncommon neurological condition afflicting as few as 2 million Americans, causing them to experience uncontrolled, inappropriate bouts of laughter or tears.

What  links these two unusual maladies? Big Pharma hype: Both have taken starring roles in audacious and apparently successful advertising and marketing campaigns that have surprised even experts in the field.

Tom_Price_official_Transition_portrait-150x150Chris_Collins_113th_Congress-150x150Chuck_Flieschmann_Official_Portrait_112th_Congress-150x150Patty_Murray_official_portrait_113th_Congress-150x150
Sheldon_Whitehouse_2010-1-150x150

Photos:  Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse,  Sen. Patty Murray,  Rep. Chuck Fleischmann,  Rep. Chris Collins, HHS Secty. Tom Price

The U.S. Congress, based on its members’ legally required financial disclosures, fares far better than most. Senators and representatives are worth a net $1 million on average. But is it seemly for so many of our crucial voices in the nation’s capital to be enriching themselves even more, with some trading stocks in areas—like health care—in which they also are legislating?

Politico, the website devoted to politics, deserves credit for digging into 21,300 stock trades lawmakers made in the last two years. Reporters found that 384 of the nation’s 535 members of the House and Senate had zero such activity. But a handful of lawmakers accounted for hefty dealing, with Mike McCaul, a Texas House Republican, racking up more than 7,000 trades.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information