Articles Posted in Statistics

alcohol-248x300When topics like booze and health flow together, common sense seems to disappear. So let’s give credit to the context-restoring efforts of Aaron Carroll— a pediatrics faculty member at Indiana University medical school, a health policy researcher, and a writer for the New York Times’ “Upshot” column—and healthnewsreview.org, a health information watch dog site.

Both addressed a “panic” in certain quarters generated by a new caution issued by the American Society of Clinical Oncologists. The respected organization of cancer medical specialists said that even light alcohol consumption can add to drinkers’ cancer risks.

As Carroll summarized the cancer experts warning:

cdccancer-271x300Those carrying around a few pounds extra, or maybe even a lot more, may want to get moving and to drop that excess weight for yet more compelling health causes: That’s because more than 630,000 Americans were diagnosed in 2014 with cancers linked to obesity or overweight, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported.

The CDC says 40 percent of all diagnosed cancers were associated with obesity. At a time when the nation is seeing some success in reducing overall rates of diagnosed cancers, a baker’s dozen of overweight-related cancers increased 7 percent between 2005 and 2014. Two out of three of the cancers occurred in those 50- to 74-years-old.

Federal officials have found that more than half of Americans don’t know there’s a connection between 13 kinds of cancers (see diagram) and excess weight. It took public health officials decades to persuade the public that smoking posed cancer health risks and people needed to stop—and Big Tobacco still resorts to unceasing, deceptive tactics to undermine this awareness.

newmitch-300x176After weeks of huddling in partisan secrecy, majority Republicans in the U.S. Senate have coughed up what they’ve dubbed the Better Care Reconciliation Act , aka their version of Trumpcare.

In brief, the GOP Senate bill would:

  • Slash Medicaid, faster and more than the House version, aka the American Health Care Act

us_inequality_600px
Although most Americans finally may be breaking out of cigarette smoking’s killer grip, Big Tobacco keeps inflicting terrible harm on some of the nation’s most vulnerable—the poor, uneducated, and those who live in rural areas.

The federal Centers for Disease Control has just offered its annual assessment on Americans’ smoking habits, providing some rare good news about most of us and especially kids: Cigarette smoking among the nation’s youth is diving to new lows, and the use of smokeless or e-cigarettes for “vaping” showed its first declines.

Anti-smoking campaigns may be working, persuading teens and many adults to avoid smoking or to quit the bad habit that has been proven to cause cancers and to contribute to heart disease and other damaging conditions, the CDC says. The agency also notes that youth vaping and smoking may have declined due to new age-based restrictions on product sales and advertising.

kid-belts-300x300Keeping kids safe is a constant challenge. Here are some new cautions from recent news reports:

Seat belts save lives—if used, and correctly

Although seat belts can be big lifesavers and a major way to protect passengers from injury, they don’t work if they’re not used—and correctly—especially with children. More than 4 in 10 youngsters killed in vehicular crashes between 2010 and 2014 were improperly restrained, particularly in vehicles’ front seat, or they weren’t buckled in at all, researchers found after studying National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data.

mitchPresident Trump and the Republican-controlled Congress haven’t repealed the Affordable Care Act. Yet.

Still, analyses show how, as one critic said, the GOP plans a big move of federal money from “health to wealth”—to take support from the poor and middle class, especially from the very voters who put Trump in office, to finance a $1 trillion tax cut for the rich, Big Pharma, medical device makers, and, yes, operators of tanning salons.

There’s been a huge amount of press coverage, but look at some key health care numbers—from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, the White House, and health policy experts— and see if this motivates you to get in touch with your elected officials:

PE-Color-240x300As partisans race to fulfill their seven-year political pledge to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act, aka  Obamacare, their rhetoric has collided with reality, posing huge questions as to how responsibly they will act in the days ahead in regard to Americans’ health.

Curiously, the new president made no mention of health care in his inaugural address, and the White House web site, when it changed over, did not list this among top issues for the new administration.

But late Friday, President Trump signed an executive order, just several paragraphs long, that directed federal agencies to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from or delay” ACA rules — a move, symbolically if nothing else, to gut Obamacare, by undercutting, for example,  enforcement of its key requirement for Americans to carry health insurance or face penalties.

price-portrait-300x253The Republican-controlled Senate has launched itself in a late-night session on the path to its long-pledged repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. The GOP-controlled House on  Friday the 13th followed close behind.

Lawmakers have chosen a complex parliamentary path. GOP members are expressing confusion about their way forward, even as doubts are being voiced by GOP governors in states where the ACA has expanded health care for the poor through Medicaid. The president-elect has called for swift action — insisting on not just Obamacare’s repeal but also its replacement with an undefined plan that he says will provide health care coverage that’s better than what exists now and for more Americans.

With big, many, and byzantine legislative steps needing to be taken even beyond “repeal,” can the ACA be replaced, too — and with what?

money-300x193What if you bought the hottest car around, only to find a neighbor found a model just as sporty and paid much less? How would you react if you opened your credit card bill and learned that the family budget was in tatters because your daughter commuted a few blocks to school by taxi, and your son had racked up huge charges for junky electronic gadgets and questionable movies online? Your consternation would be a tiny fraction of the great concern that most of us should experience due to a new study that finds that Americans spent $3.2 trillion on health care in 2014.

If you’re like me, when figures get that big, they become hard to grasp. But for comparison’s sake, the United States’ medical spending  exceeded the 2015 gross domestic product (the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a given country’s borders in a specific time period) for the economies of: Britain, France, Canada, Russia, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Australia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and the Netherlands.

Americans spent more on back and neck pain than Russia did on its military and national defense.

cdc death causesImportant indicators about Americans’ health and well-being are trending the wrong way: For the first time in almost a quarter century, the nation’s life expectancy has declined.  Meantime, fatal overdoses by Americans taking opioid drugs continued to surge and exceeded 30,000 in 2015. And abuse of heroin has exceeded that of traditional prescription painkillers, with deaths due to heroin-related causes surpassing gun homicides.

Experts were surprised by the life expectancy decline, which reflected an increase in eight of the top 10 causes of death (see figure right from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics) including heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s—but not cancer.

It may be a statistical blip from one particularly bad year. The last time a comparable dip occurred was in 1993 due to high rates of deaths from HIV-AIDS, flu, homicides, and accidental deaths. Some experts said the decline in life expectancy, which for men fell on average in years from 78.9 to 78.8, may be attributable to increasing issues with Americans and obesity, and health care hitting limits on progress against heart disease.

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