Articles Posted in Research Studies

newmitch-300x176After weeks of huddling in partisan secrecy, majority Republicans in the U.S. Senate have coughed up what they’ve dubbed the Better Care Reconciliation Act , aka their version of Trumpcare.

In brief, the GOP Senate bill would:

  • Slash Medicaid, faster and more than the House version, aka the American Health Care Act

obesity-300x161Although weight issues plague Americans as gravely as anywhere on the planet, obesity also has become a global woe, increasing sharply over the last three decades in 195 countries and afflicting an estimated 604 million adults and 108 million children—roughly 10 percent of the world’s population.

No nation on earth, even with the terrible toll that obesity takes in economic and health terms, has found a way to get its people skinnier and healthier: Weight woes are blowing up in disparate places like Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Mali, and Guinea-Bissau, international researchers have reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Obesity is now a major concern, too, for the people of China, Turkey, Venezuela, and Bhutan.

Public health experts worry about the skyrocketing numbers of overweight people around the planet because evidence shows obesity to be a major factor in heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other debilitating conditions.  These afflictions, combined with weight issues—including among those considered to be too heavy but not necessarily obese—contributed to four million deaths in 2015 alone, said the experts, participating as part of the Global Burden of Disease initiative.

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Although most Americans finally may be breaking out of cigarette smoking’s killer grip, Big Tobacco keeps inflicting terrible harm on some of the nation’s most vulnerable—the poor, uneducated, and those who live in rural areas.

The federal Centers for Disease Control has just offered its annual assessment on Americans’ smoking habits, providing some rare good news about most of us and especially kids: Cigarette smoking among the nation’s youth is diving to new lows, and the use of smokeless or e-cigarettes for “vaping” showed its first declines.

Anti-smoking campaigns may be working, persuading teens and many adults to avoid smoking or to quit the bad habit that has been proven to cause cancers and to contribute to heart disease and other damaging conditions, the CDC says. The agency also notes that youth vaping and smoking may have declined due to new age-based restrictions on product sales and advertising.

bike-300x300As more Americans try to stay healthier and to beat the pains of commuting by car, bus, or light rail systems, many (including yours truly) have turned to bicycling. But as a result, non-fatal bike injuries have skyrocketed—especially for men and for riders older than 45—and two-wheel collision treatment has become expensive: The annual cost of medical care for bike crashes in 2013 alone exceeded $24.4 billion, double the amount for all occupational illnesses.

Those are findings of a multi-year study (1997-2013) of electronic records on 3.8 million non-fatal and 9,839 bike-related deaths, research published in Injury Prevention, an online specialty journal.

A key reason why the cost of cycling wrecks—including for emergency transport, hospital charges, rehabilitation, nursing home stays, and lost work and quality of life—has raced upwards: Bikers more than ever are mixing it up with cars on streets.  Road collisions accounted for just under half of biking injuries in 1997. They’re almost two-thirds of such wrecks now.

softball-300x197Although fans may fret when pros like the Nationals’ Bryce Harper get hit by a pitcher—and brawls ensue—some amateur athletes are the most likely to be struck and hurt: Ball-contact injuries are highest among female softball players, followed by women who play field hockey.

That’s according to new research on thousands of college athletes that found that less than half of the female athletes’ injuries when hit by balls caused them to lose playing time. Most suffered bruises (30.5 percent) and sprains (23.1 percent). But concussions were among the most commonly recorded serious injuries, occurring in 16.1 percent of cases, with finger fractures an issue, too.

When injuries were compared between men and women in baseball-softball, basketball, and soccer, female athletes had a larger proportion of ball-contact injuries diagnosed as concussions than did men, researchers found.

girls-300x208It isn’t a teary topic fit only for moody young adult fiction and sudsy afternoon TV dramas: Depression afflicts as many as a third of girls, becoming a rising problem for some as early as age 11 and increasingly separating out as gender difference in the mental health between boys and girls.

The higher incidence of depression in girls—found in interview research with more than 100,000 young participants from 2009 to 2014 in the annual, statistically representative National Survey of Drug Use and Health—has raised concern among mental health experts. They note that depression can cause patients to struggle with relationships and school. It can lead some to suicide and may require sustained treatment for those with more serious cases.

Researchers could not explain why girls are more affected by depression, and they were surprised to find the earlier gender divergence, with it occurring at younger ages than had been tracked before. This tends to undercut existing psychological theories, they said, that depression in girls may be triggered by hormone changes or other significant life shifts that occur in their teens.

embarrass-300x172Health news readers look out: media organizations seem to be struggling with an outbreak of the whoopsies—as in, “Whoopsie, if we had more sense, we wouldn’t have put out the story you just read.”

The flare-up of embarrassing content, as chronicled well by the Healthnewsreview.org, a health information watchdog site, also seems to be a double problem for some media outlets that ironically have just warned their audiences about fake news.

As always, the dubious, low-value information concentrates on diet and nutrition topics — for instance, that small amounts of alcohol or coffee sway cancer risk or that eating chocolate makes your heart beat more regularly.

kid-belts-300x300Keeping kids safe is a constant challenge. Here are some new cautions from recent news reports:

Seat belts save lives—if used, and correctly

Although seat belts can be big lifesavers and a major way to protect passengers from injury, they don’t work if they’re not used—and correctly—especially with children. More than 4 in 10 youngsters killed in vehicular crashes between 2010 and 2014 were improperly restrained, particularly in vehicles’ front seat, or they weren’t buckled in at all, researchers found after studying National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data.

Blausen_0601_LaparoscopicGastricBanding-300x300They once got a ton of hype with radio, TV, and print ads, as well as billboard campaigns by proponents who later proved to be nothing less than sketchy. But the much-touted lap-band weight surgeries have fallen out of favor. The number of the procedures performed annually has nose-dived.

Researchers, based on a longer view, are finding that, among bariatric weight-loss options, lap-band surgeries offer some of the poorest results and result in frequent added procedures—at big costs, both economic and to disappointed, suffering patients.

Vox, the online news site, deserves credit for pulling together a painful review of what once was the most common way for overweight Americans, mostly women, to tackle one of the nation’s epidemic conditions: obesity.

hopkins-300x240It long has been a controversial bit of conventional wisdom. But big teaching hospitals may be a better place for older, sicker patients to go for care, a new study finds. They also may pay more for the treatment, as these institutions have become so large, bureaucratic, and revenue oriented.

Researchers at Harvard and hospitals in the Boston area published an observational study of 21 million Medicare hospitalizations, finding older, sicker patients had better 30- and 90-day mortality rates in 250 major teaching hospitals as compared with 894 institutions with minor teaching roles and 3,339 nonteaching hospitals.

When adjusting for factors that might affect results, the percentage of patients who died within 30 days of hospitalization—one quality measure— was 8.3 percent at major teaching hospitals, versus 9.2 percent at minor teaching hospitals and 9.5 percent at non-teaching hospitals, Stat, the online health information site has reported. That data means one fewer patient dies for every 83 the teaching hospitals treat.

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