Articles Posted in Hospitals

umc-pic-300x111Health officials caught expectant mothers, local politicians, and the D.C. community off guard by ordering the only full-service hospital in the southeast part of the District of Columbia to stop delivering babies and to shut its nursery for 90 days.

Details weren’t provided as to why D.C. regulators slapped restrictions on United Medical Center’s obstetrics and nursery care license. The hospital itself has acknowledged that at least three incidents, which it says it cannot discuss due to rigorous federal patient privacy rules, prompted the official rebuke.

This shutdown provides a harsh reminder just how little the public gets to know about important issues affecting doctors, hospitals, and patient safety and quality care.

records-300x200Although patients can protect their own health by getting copies of their medical records, few consumers get them, and fewer still take advantage of the federal government’s push to make records easily  available electronically, one of Uncle Sam’s big public protection agencies reports.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office also warns that tumult in the nation’s health care system, notably in Congress’ roller-coaster deliberations to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, may disrupt patients’ relationships with caregivers. That makes it even more vital for consumers to have their health records.

The Association of Health Care Journalists deserves a tip of the cap for pointing to the GAO blog, where experts note that the ACA had supported a national push to get doctors and hospitals to adopt electronic health records with the aim of providing patients and caregivers more access and transparency about these crucial materials.

obama-240x300As the late, sultry diva Peggy Lee used to croon: Is that all there is?

The Republicans in Washington, after seven years of trying and dozens of faux earlier votes, have failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. Obamacare, the signature legislation of the previous Democratic administration, persists as the law of the land.

Not hearing champagne corks flying after the end for now of the desperate legislative floundering of Republicans in the House, Senate, and White House?

ExpiredDrug-300x225Americans each year needlessly toss hundreds of millions of dollars in costly, valuable, and still potent drugs, a wasteful practice driven by a “myth,” the mistaken belief in and scrupulous adherence to already debunked product expiration dates.

Drug discards, including of medications that may be in short supply nationwide, occur all along the distribution chain, from corner druggists up to giant health system pharmacies.

The practice flies in the face of known evidence, much of it developed, verified, and shared by the same force that presses for expired meds to get tossed: Uncle Sam.

nucarmen-189x300Although smaller community hospitals may provide treatments that are as good and as safe, Americans flock to academic medical centers for specialized care and complex procedures. They’re lured to the big, pricey institutions by their stellar reputations, state-of-the-art facilities, and top-line specialists. These tall, shiny complexes, combining medical education, research and clinical care, also have deep roots in their communities and become political powerhouses in their own right.

Which is why many in the nation’s No. 2 city are abuzz over a Los Angeles Times investigation into the “secret life” of Carmen A. Puliafito, a Harvard-trained eye expert. Until 18 months ago, he had served for a decade as the $1 million-a-year dean of the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine. As Keck’s top doc, the paper says, he “oversaw hundreds of medical students, thousands of professors and clinicians, and research grants totaling more than $200 million … [and] was a key fundraiser for USC, bringing in more than $1 billion in donations, by his estimation.”

The university—which is Los Angeles County’s largest employer, a haven for affluent offspring of West Coast elites, and long has craved global recognition—hired and backed Puliafito to boost the medical school’s  standing.  But during his tenure, the Los Angeles Times found, Puliafito also “kept company with a circle of criminals and drug users who said he used methamphetamine and other drugs with them.” As the paper describes it:

PE-Color-240x300The Republicans haven’t waved a white flag—yet. They may never formally surrender. But the GOP’s seven-year, take-no-prisoners campaign to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has foundered. For good?

Political prediction is a knucklehead’s sport. It’s never safe to predict what’s going to happen, especially when unpredictable tragedies rear up like  Sen. John McCain’s brain cancer diagnosis.

No matter. We now know painful truths about the politicians who have sway over our health care—and will continue to do so in vast ways, Trumpcare or no.

fda-300x125Pro-business and anti-consumer  lawmakers in Congress are racing to slacken rules for medical device makers to report problems with their products. This move may imperil more patients, many of whom already have been harmed and some even killed already by defective and dangerous medical devices.

The dispute focuses on a provision to triple the time that companies would get to report product issues to the federal Food and Drug, giving medical device makers three months to do so, rather than 30 days as now required. They still must report to the agency immediately any incident in which a patient is harmed.

Although consumer safety advocates are decrying the oversight changes that GOP members of Congress are pressing, medical device makers are downplaying the regulatory shifts, saying they will eliminate needless bureaucracy. They say that if lawmakers don’t approve the rule changes it may sink the broader and crucial legislation they’re embedded in. The House has just approved and sent to the U.S. Senate the bigger FDA bill, which also provides 60 percent of the fee-based funds for agency drug and medical device reviews.

anesthesia-300x153Some of the very medical specialists who are supposed to put patients to sleep experience big problems themselves staying awake, with more than half of anesthetic trainees reporting in a new national survey in Britain that they had crashed their cars or nearly done so while headed home after long night shifts.

American doctors’ social media responses to this new research indicate that work weariness and drowsy driving are perils for practitioners on this side of the Atlantic, too.

The doctors’ complaints also underscores the irrationality of recent decisions by American medical educators to reinstate long shifts for interns and residents, trainees who play important—and sleep-deprived— front-line roles in providing medical services to too many patients in academic medical centers and hospitals nationwide.

kessler-203x300Even as congressional Republicans advance their counter-factual campaign to strip patients who have been harmed while seeking medical services of their rights to seek legal redress, another state appeals court has rejected key GOP arguments about medical malpractice lawsuits.

An appellate court in Wisconsin has declared unconstitutional that state’s $750,000 cap on non-economic damages, reinstating a jury’s decision that a Milwaukee woman and her husband should be paid $16.5 million for their pain and suffering after emergency doctors failed to inform her fully about the severity of a strep infection she had and that led to the amputation of her arms and legs.

The jury assessed total damages against the doctors and their insurers of $25.3 million, including $8 million for the medical and other care the 57-year-old mother of four will require for the rest of her life. But the defendants appealed the total, arguing the couple, under Wisconsin law, should get no more than $750,000 for non-economic harms like pain and suffering.

Nursing-home-holding-hands-300x200Federal regulators need to ramp up their oversight of nursing homes, big time, with recent news reports and studies finding persistent abuses of elderly patients, including during crackdowns on problem operators, and facilities failing to care for vulnerable charges so they don’t lapse into emergency or hospital care.

Jordan Rau and the independent Kaiser Health News Service deserve kudos for digging into Uncle Sam’s “special focus status,” in which the nation’s “most dangerous” nursing homes get an ultimatum to correct major and continuing harms to patients or they may lose crucial Medicaid and Medicare funds from the federal government.

Rau found that more than half of the 528 homes deemed since 2014 to require the supposedly stringent “special focus” from regulators and that still are operating have since harmed patients or put them in jeopardy in the last three years.

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