Articles Posted in Heart Disease

booze-256x1024It’s more than happy hour chardonnays with office mates or malt liquors  at a summer barbecue.

Public health experts are warning that alcohol drinking is rising sharply, and in especially worrisome fashion for women, seniors, African Americans, Latinos, and Americans of Asian descent. As the nation struggles with addiction crises—especially a plague of opioid drug abuse—booze woes may be getting less than their deserved attention.

Our heavy and increasing alcohol consumption, as captured in a sizable and regular survey of Americans’ tippling habits, should be of big concern. That’s because experts note that it can “portend increases in many chronic co-morbidities in which alcohol use has a substantial role.”

cig-300x225The nation’s long war on one of its leading preventable killers has taken a surprising tactical turn, as the head of the federal Food and Drug Administration has declared that tobacco companies will face new regulations aimed at slashing nicotine in cigarettes.

FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb argues that cutting the noxious and addictive nicotine will help Americans unhook themselves from tobacco use, prompting less cigarette smoking, and, potentially increasing the use of possibly less harmful health vices, like nonburning “e-cigarettes” for vaping.

Gottlieb, at the same time, put further off a planned FDA crackdown on e-cigarette makers, delaying for several years requirements that they disclose ingredients in their colorful, flavored vaping liquids and demonstrate that they and other e-cigarette products do not cause health harms.

Pinocchio_Smoking-300x169Tougher ratings for movies targeting teen-agers and higher cigarette taxes may be two good ways to crack down on Big Tobacco’s persistent and harmful peddling of its poisonous wares, health experts say, based on information flowing from the sprawling Golden State.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has just assessed Hollywood’s progress in reducing depictions of tobacco in the movies, finding that, under pressure from anti-smoking campaigns,  Tinsel Town had slashed its showing of the use or implied use of cigarettes, cigars, pipes, hookah, smokeless tobacco products and electronic cigarettes from 2005 to 2010. But that progress has reversed since then, and now, based on top 10 grossing movies in any calendar week, cinematic depictions of tobacco use has soared by 80 percent.

Although pictures rated G or PG, those films most accessible to the broadest movie-going audiences, saw reductions in their showing of smoking and other tobacco use, depictions of these negative health practices rose sharply in movies aimed more at teenagers and older youths  in those works with ratings of PG-13 (by 43 percent) and R (by 90 percent).

opioid-graficAlthough Americans may like to think that it doesn’t or shouldn’t matter as much as it does, where they live can have major effects on their health. Geography isn’t an absolute determinant, but key differences have been discerned in how it affects the prescribing dangerous opioid drugs, cancer death rates, some air pollution harms, and risks of insect-related infections. Let’s look at specifics:

Opioid prescribing dips but data show big regional differences

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has provided a rare glimmer of good news about the nation’s epidemic of powerful painkiller abuse, finding that the peak of doctors’ opioid drug prescribing appears to have occurred in 2010 and has dropped sharply since.

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Although most Americans finally may be breaking out of cigarette smoking’s killer grip, Big Tobacco keeps inflicting terrible harm on some of the nation’s most vulnerable—the poor, uneducated, and those who live in rural areas.

The federal Centers for Disease Control has just offered its annual assessment on Americans’ smoking habits, providing some rare good news about most of us and especially kids: Cigarette smoking among the nation’s youth is diving to new lows, and the use of smokeless or e-cigarettes for “vaping” showed its first declines.

Anti-smoking campaigns may be working, persuading teens and many adults to avoid smoking or to quit the bad habit that has been proven to cause cancers and to contribute to heart disease and other damaging conditions, the CDC says. The agency also notes that youth vaping and smoking may have declined due to new age-based restrictions on product sales and advertising.

vaper-300x112The Trump Administration has sent disturbing signals on whether it will keep Big Tobacco from hooking more Americans on high-tech, nicotine-addictive products—so-called e-cigarettes used, especially by the young, for “vaping,” as well as cigars and hookahs.

The federal Food and Drug Administration, almost exactly a year ago, announced it would crack down, in particular, on e-cigarettes, forcing their makers to submit them for regulatory approval and oversight. Uncle Sam also barred makers from targeting the young with certain kinds of product advertising and giveaways. E-cigarettes still cannot be sold to consumers younger than 18 and free samples are still barred.

But the Washington Post has reported that the administration is delaying key aspects of its rules on vaping, cigars, and hookahs so newly installed federal health officials can get up to speed in their posts.

defib-st-judeThe serious, slowly disclosed problems of a manufacturer and its implanted heart defibrillators may offer more needed cautions to Food and Drug Administration critics who want regulators to rush the oversight of drug and medical device makers and make the agency more welcoming to big business.

St. Jude Medical, the New York Times has reported, has received a written rebuke that the FDA has hit the wall with the company and wants it to deal with its product problems. The agency says it is fed up because the company has dawdled for years in letting patients, as well as its senior management and medical advisory board know that it long has experienced major woes with its heart devices batteries.

St. Jude has been forced to issue recall notices on hundreds of thousands of its defibrillators. Hundreds of cases have been reported in which their batteries died unexpectedly. Dozens of patients have suffered “adverse effects,” and at least two deaths have been attributed to device failures.

repatha®-evolocumab-product-shot-5-HR-300x189With all the public attention now focused on soaring drug costs, Big Pharma just can’t seem to stay out of the spotlight. Drug makers are keeping up their eyebrow-raising actions, as are purveyors of so-called “stem cell” treatments, and it’s worth noting some of what’s happening with these:

Will insurers, MDs, patients pay for $14,000-a-year cholesterol fighting drug?

Mick_Mulvaney_Official_Portrait_113th_Congress_cropped-249x300The  Trump budget for the federal government would be a huge step back from investment in medical research with consequences for many years in progress on promoting health and fighting disease.

The budget announcement, tilted so far toward guns over butter, proved so challenging to even members of Trump’s own controlling party that lawmakers hastened to underscore that Congress, and not the chief executive, theoretically, holds  the nation’s purse strings.

The president would boost allocations for the military by more than $50 billion, and significantly increase spending for homeland security, with billions for his proposed border wall as well as more customs and immigration agents nationwide. He would gut almost 80 federal programs, providing support for everything from the arts and public broadcasting to home weatherization, rural economic development, legal services for the poor, and meals on wheels food services for the old and sick.

QCBFL_-_Snow_Game_2011_Vander_Veer_Park_Davenport_Iowa-300x200Get up. Move. Pace. Walk around the block. Swim some laps at the Y. Hit the greens over the weekend, go dancing on Friday night, or jump into Saturday or Sunday games of touch football or pickup basketball. Exercise needn’t be strenuous to benefit your health and well-being in many ways, research continues to confirm. With a new year under way and lots going on for so many of us, activity also can play a significant role in diminishing the harms of stress.

The New York Times has put out pertinent stories on how:

  • Exercise, even a gentle walk around the block — yes, with a two- or four-footed eager companion — can improve people’s moods, making them happier.

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