Articles Posted in Heart Disease

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Although most Americans finally may be breaking out of cigarette smoking’s killer grip, Big Tobacco keeps inflicting terrible harm on some of the nation’s most vulnerable—the poor, uneducated, and those who live in rural areas.

The federal Centers for Disease Control has just offered its annual assessment on Americans’ smoking habits, providing some rare good news about most of us and especially kids: Cigarette smoking among the nation’s youth is diving to new lows, and the use of smokeless or e-cigarettes for “vaping” showed its first declines.

Anti-smoking campaigns may be working, persuading teens and many adults to avoid smoking or to quit the bad habit that has been proven to cause cancers and to contribute to heart disease and other damaging conditions, the CDC says. The agency also notes that youth vaping and smoking may have declined due to new age-based restrictions on product sales and advertising.

vaper-300x112The Trump Administration has sent disturbing signals on whether it will keep Big Tobacco from hooking more Americans on high-tech, nicotine-addictive products—so-called e-cigarettes used, especially by the young, for “vaping,” as well as cigars and hookahs.

The federal Food and Drug Administration, almost exactly a year ago, announced it would crack down, in particular, on e-cigarettes, forcing their makers to submit them for regulatory approval and oversight. Uncle Sam also barred makers from targeting the young with certain kinds of product advertising and giveaways. E-cigarettes still cannot be sold to consumers younger than 18 and free samples are still barred.

But the Washington Post has reported that the administration is delaying key aspects of its rules on vaping, cigars, and hookahs so newly installed federal health officials can get up to speed in their posts.

defib-st-judeThe serious, slowly disclosed problems of a manufacturer and its implanted heart defibrillators may offer more needed cautions to Food and Drug Administration critics who want regulators to rush the oversight of drug and medical device makers and make the agency more welcoming to big business.

St. Jude Medical, the New York Times has reported, has received a written rebuke that the FDA has hit the wall with the company and wants it to deal with its product problems. The agency says it is fed up because the company has dawdled for years in letting patients, as well as its senior management and medical advisory board know that it long has experienced major woes with its heart devices batteries.

St. Jude has been forced to issue recall notices on hundreds of thousands of its defibrillators. Hundreds of cases have been reported in which their batteries died unexpectedly. Dozens of patients have suffered “adverse effects,” and at least two deaths have been attributed to device failures.

repatha®-evolocumab-product-shot-5-HR-300x189With all the public attention now focused on soaring drug costs, Big Pharma just can’t seem to stay out of the spotlight. Drug makers are keeping up their eyebrow-raising actions, as are purveyors of so-called “stem cell” treatments, and it’s worth noting some of what’s happening with these:

Will insurers, MDs, patients pay for $14,000-a-year cholesterol fighting drug?

Mick_Mulvaney_Official_Portrait_113th_Congress_cropped-249x300The  Trump budget for the federal government would be a huge step back from investment in medical research with consequences for many years in progress on promoting health and fighting disease.

The budget announcement, tilted so far toward guns over butter, proved so challenging to even members of Trump’s own controlling party that lawmakers hastened to underscore that Congress, and not the chief executive, theoretically, holds  the nation’s purse strings.

The president would boost allocations for the military by more than $50 billion, and significantly increase spending for homeland security, with billions for his proposed border wall as well as more customs and immigration agents nationwide. He would gut almost 80 federal programs, providing support for everything from the arts and public broadcasting to home weatherization, rural economic development, legal services for the poor, and meals on wheels food services for the old and sick.

QCBFL_-_Snow_Game_2011_Vander_Veer_Park_Davenport_Iowa-300x200Get up. Move. Pace. Walk around the block. Swim some laps at the Y. Hit the greens over the weekend, go dancing on Friday night, or jump into Saturday or Sunday games of touch football or pickup basketball. Exercise needn’t be strenuous to benefit your health and well-being in many ways, research continues to confirm. With a new year under way and lots going on for so many of us, activity also can play a significant role in diminishing the harms of stress.

The New York Times has put out pertinent stories on how:

  • Exercise, even a gentle walk around the block — yes, with a two- or four-footed eager companion — can improve people’s moods, making them happier.

obamacare-cartoon-2-a-300x240As the already known complications to its demise have increased by the minute, there may be some detectable pauses in the partisan zeal to give the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, the bum’s rush. That’s because the legislation’s repeal-and-replace proponents — despite seven years and several dozen U.S. House votes  to roll back the ACA — have yet to detail how 20 million Americans who have gotten health insurance under Obamacare will be covered in the days ahead.

Opponents also haven’t explained how they may change the far reach of the ACA, including how the law and the Obama administration have reshaped, and often, improved American health care, for example, by changing entrenched payment practices and forcing greater accountability.

The New York Times, in reviewing the presidential legacy, has reported on what it terms the transformational aspects of Obamacare that also may sustain, no matter the partisan attacks on the attempt to provide broader health insurance coverage. In brief, the paper says Obamacare forced health care in this country to become more data-driven and evidence-based, as well as refocused on patients and their needs. Although some of the major drivers of these reforms, including hefty spending for electronic health records, haven’t hit the high marks advocates hoped for, progress has occurred.

money-300x193What if you bought the hottest car around, only to find a neighbor found a model just as sporty and paid much less? How would you react if you opened your credit card bill and learned that the family budget was in tatters because your daughter commuted a few blocks to school by taxi, and your son had racked up huge charges for junky electronic gadgets and questionable movies online? Your consternation would be a tiny fraction of the great concern that most of us should experience due to a new study that finds that Americans spent $3.2 trillion on health care in 2014.

If you’re like me, when figures get that big, they become hard to grasp. But for comparison’s sake, the United States’ medical spending  exceeded the 2015 gross domestic product (the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a given country’s borders in a specific time period) for the economies of: Britain, France, Canada, Russia, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Australia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and the Netherlands.

Americans spent more on back and neck pain than Russia did on its military and national defense.

cdc death causesImportant indicators about Americans’ health and well-being are trending the wrong way: For the first time in almost a quarter century, the nation’s life expectancy has declined.  Meantime, fatal overdoses by Americans taking opioid drugs continued to surge and exceeded 30,000 in 2015. And abuse of heroin has exceeded that of traditional prescription painkillers, with deaths due to heroin-related causes surpassing gun homicides.

Experts were surprised by the life expectancy decline, which reflected an increase in eight of the top 10 causes of death (see figure right from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics) including heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s—but not cancer.

It may be a statistical blip from one particularly bad year. The last time a comparable dip occurred was in 1993 due to high rates of deaths from HIV-AIDS, flu, homicides, and accidental deaths. Some experts said the decline in life expectancy, which for men fell on average in years from 78.9 to 78.8, may be attributable to increasing issues with Americans and obesity, and health care hitting limits on progress against heart disease.

NL_DifferenceThere’s  more encouraging news about dementia rates, which a new study has found fell 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, decreasing among Americans 65 and older from 11.6 percent to 8.8 percent. The experts aren’t sure why the rates declined. But it means that 1.5 million or so seniors will be spared the severe cognitive declines that would have been expected from earlier rates of the tragic disease.

Researchers, who published their latest findings in the peer reviewed and respected Journal of the American Medical Association, said that greater educational attainment and improved heart health may have led to the decreases in the prevalence of the condition associated with loss of memory or other mental abilities so severe it interferes with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease is most commonly linked to dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia and occurs after a stroke.

The new study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and on Aging (NIH and NIA), produced continuing surprises as experts have projected an explosion in cases among Americans, who are increasingly gray, obese, and diabetic—factors that significantly increase dementia risks.

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