Articles Posted in Gynecology

medicare-300x109Callous institutional inertia can allow dangerous doctors to keep harming patients. But media digging deserves credit for raising needed alarms when professional caregivers and others fail to step up to protect individuals as disparate as taxpayers, seniors, coeds, and heart transplant recipients.

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel and MedPage Today performed a public service, reporting that they found more than 200 doctors nationwide who surrendered a license, had one revoked, or were excluded from state-paid health care rolls in the previous five years  but somehow remained on the federal Medicare rolls in 2015.

This meant the problem doctors could keep bad practices afloat, in part because Uncle Sam ─ that’s taxpayers like you and me ─ paid these hundreds of MDs $25.8 million to care for seniors, among the nation’s most vulnerable patients.

maternalmorbidity-300x193Here is a  sobering public health angle on Mother’s Day.

Experts on international health and development, including the likes of Pulitzer Prize-winning foreign correspondent and columnist Nick Kristof, long have argued that a key way to major improvements in distant lands rests in boosting the lot of women and girls. It’s an issue that clearly also needs attention closer to home.

National Public Radio and Pro Publica, a Pulitzer-winning investigative site, deserve yet more credit for their continuing dig into a shame of contemporary American health care — why U.S. mothers die in childbirth at a far higher rate than in all other developed countries. Their latest disturbing reporting focuses on some unacceptable numbers:

The birth of Prince Louis Arthur Charles brought joy to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, but the regal baby’s arrival also provided cause for harsh comparisons of maternal costs and safety for more ordinary expectant moms on this side of the Atlantic.

Two magazines — Foreign Policy and the Economist — both poked at how much less the fabulously wealthy royals paid for a posh delivery of their baby, as compared with what a typical American mom might. They reported that 24 hours in the luxe Lindo Wing of St. Mary’s Hospital in London goes for $8,900, vs. the $12,900 an American would pay for a routine delivery in a noisy, regular U.S. hospital. And if the royals had gone without the private frills, their cost would have been zero.

If an American woman has a cesarean or any delivery complications, her delivery costs typically jump to almost $17,000, or $30,000, or even more, whereas her British and Canadian counterparts, as Foreign Policy reported, typically “pay nothing for their maternity care and delivery, with low risks of maternal and infant mortality.”

Nassar-Mich-AG-and-AP
His basic credentials would come under fire, but they were sufficient for the “doctor” to insinuate himself into major institutions, and, worse, into the lives of hundreds of girls and young women on whom he inflicted a tragic toll. His combination of enthusiasm — he was a rah-rah kind of guy— extreme controlling conduct, and horrific “treatments” never seemed to set off the red flags they should have.

Instead, Larry Nassar — an osteopath who served as an athletics and team caregiver for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University — got away for years with abusing adolescent females put under his  sway. He purportedly provided medical services to them, many in exclusive and demanding athletic camps where young participants were cut off from their friends, family, coaches, and personal physicians. He “treated” aspiring Olympians, at all hours of the night and day, alone and without any other adults around, in their bedrooms, on their beds — not in medical offices or athletic training facilities.

He enthusiastically told his patients, many of whom excelled at their sport because of their willingness to please adults and to be coached, that he could deal with their pains and injuries with what he termed pelvic manipulations in which he digitally penetrated them in their private parts. Without medical cause or justification, he conducted repeated and invasive “exams” of girls and young women’s genitals.

blkmom-300x222The bad news for expectant black moms isn’t confined to those living in the nation’s capital: A new investigation has found higher risks of harm for women in New York, Florida, and Illinois when they deliver at hospitals that disproportionately serve black mothers.

ProPublica, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative site, analyzed two years of hospital inpatient discharge data from the three states to “look in-depth at how well different facilities treat women who experience one particular problem — hemorrhages — while giving birth.” Reporters found negative patterns that underscored big woes identified by other research before:

[B]lack women … fare worse in pregnancy and childbirth, dying at a rate more than triple that of white mothers. And while part of the disparity can be attributed to factors like poverty and inadequate access to health care, there is growing evidence that points to the quality of care at hospitals where a disproportionate number of black women deliver, which are often in neighborhoods disadvantaged by segregation. Researchers have found that women who deliver at these so-called ‘black-serving’ hospitals are more likely to have serious complications — from infections to birth-related embolisms to emergency hysterectomies — than mothers who deliver at institutions that serve fewer black women.

gottliebThe  Food and Drug Administration has closed out the year by issuing a new white paper reaffirming the agency’s three-year-old warning to surgeons and women to avoid in general the use of a surgical device called a morcellator in “key-hole” or laparoscopic gynecological operations.

It wasn’t a surprise that the FDA retained this caution. That’s because the Wall Street Journal, back in 2014, had published a major investigative series linking morcellators to increased cancer incidences, recurrences, and risks in women. Researchers found that the popular surgical tool, by grinding up tissues such as those found in common female fibroid tumors, purportedly to permit their easier, faster removal, spread cancerous tissues throughout the body. The FDA has taken major, deserved criticism for failing for two decades to better protect thousands of women from harms caused by this medical device.

But what else did the agency do in its busy December? Scott Gottlieb, the FDA commissioner, also has reaffirmed that the FDA is motoring ahead with a stepped program to speed up an already loose approval and oversight process for medical devices like the morcellator.

https://www.protectpatientsblog.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/69/2017/04/hpv-vaccine-uptake-infographic.__v100248120-216x300.jpgMore Americans ages 18 to 59 may be infected with the human papilloma virus (HPV) than previously had been known, with 1 in 4 men and 1 in 5 women carrying high-risk strains, federal experts say.

The new findings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention may become a key part of campaigns to get more parents to vaccinate youngsters against HPV infections. They have been found to cause cervical cancer and have been tied to cancers of the throat, anus, and male and female reproductive organs.

HPV-related cancers are on the rise, and it is concerning that the CDC found that almost half of Americans’ are infected. But public health leaders have confronted ignorance and adult prudery—by physicians, public officials, and parents—as they try to get boys and girls, ages 11 and 12, inoculated and protected against the virus.

marijuana-smoking-131013-300x200Although marijuana is marching toward legalization across the United States, expectant moms may wish to think long and hard still about smoking or ingesting a substance that has become as ubiquitous in some households as aspirin or a bottle of chardonnay. The New York Times has delved into this discussion, even as other news outlets recently have provided parental warnings about hype over apps for baby care and tossing some toxic homeopathic teething remedies.

Pot? Not for expectant moms

Let’s turn first, and not be blue noses about it, to why moms would consider pot while pregnant. Data show that few do (an estimated 4 percent of more than 200,000 women in one 12-year sample — though the number had doubled in recent time). For younger women, the answer may be, just because. They don’t equate it with risk but with recreation. They say they try to be cautious with it, just as they might curtail their alcohol consumption but still have a rare drink. Older and expectant moms may use pot, as many women do, because they find it helps with depression, anxiety, stress, pain, nausea and vomiting.

breastIt’s described as an “aggressive, costly, morbid, and burdensome” surgery that often lacks “compelling evidence” that it contributes to patients’ “survival advantage.” So why are increasing numbers of women  deciding to have both their breasts removed when doctors detect early stage cancer in one breast?

New research, based on a questionnaire and follow-up with more than 2,400 women, recommends that surgeons be clearer and more direct about treatment options and outcomes with breast cancer patients. That’s because 17% of respondents said, incorrectly, that they think that removing the other healthy breast in a woman with cancer in one breast helps prevent the disease’s recurrence, while almost 40 percent said they didn’t know this procedure’s effects.

Researchers found that many women—including more than 40 percent of their respondents—with breast cancer contemplate the surgery known as contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), and that sufficient numbers of surgeons may not explain why it may be inappropriate for them. Their study has been published in the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association Surgery. As the Los Angeles Times reported:

Facts line up in some challenging ways:

Cranberries20101210Cranberry juice doesn’t work on urinary tract infections

Despite longtime belief in its potency, cranberry juice doesn’t help women with urinary tract infections (UTIs), new research confirms. Experts administered cranberry capsules to 185 female nursing home patients for a year. The standardized doses were equal to  drinking 20 ounces of juice daily. They fared no better with UTIs. That led the peer-reviewed Journal of the American Medical Association to editorialize that, “The continuing promotion of cranberry use to prevent recurrent UTI in the popular press or online advice seems inconsistent with the reality of repeated negative studies or positive studies compromised by methodological shortcomings. Any continued promotion of the use of cranberry products seems to go beyond available scientific evidence and rational reasoning.” JAMA says it is time not only to bust this myth but for proponents, including those who have a well-intentioned wish to find antibiotic alternatives, to “move on.”

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