Articles Posted in Doctor-Patient Relationship

walmartclinic-300x209Americans are showing with their feet and their money how they feel about doctors’ offices and  shiny hospitals, places they’re shunning more and more. They’re racing to neighborhood clinics and urgent care centers that seem to be popping up on every suburban street corner and shopping mall.

Before these facilities transform U.S. health care, would it be worth asking what this trend might mean, not just for profit-seeking retailers, drug store chains, and, yes, also hospitals and doctors who are shifting into new lines of business?

The New York Times found that:

FAST-infographic-2016-300x169It’s no April Fool joke: Emergency doctors across the country, according to the New York Times, have been defying widely accepted standards of care and withholding a drug that rigorous clinical trials and medical specialists long have recommended for stroke victims.

Administration of the drug, tPA or tissue plasminogen activator, helps to prevent brain injury after a stroke by dissolving the blood clot and opening up the blocked vessel. Neurologists and neurosurgeons as well as cardiologists, have campaigned for its aggressive use within hours after the onset of symptoms.  Indeed, hospitals nationwide have adopted speedy stroke care, including with tPA, under slogans like “Time is Brain.”

The drug’s fast use has become so accepted, the capacity to administer it is a keystone for hospitals to receive a much-sought designation as specialized stroke treatment centers. And though it has long been thought that tPA needed to be given within three or four hours from the start of stroke symptoms, new research funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has opened the strong possibility that many more patients could benefit from tPA and neurosurgery within 16 or even 24 hours after suffering a stroke.

Dumpster-300x251Although enthusiasts still wax on about  how technology will improve lives, patients may want to be wary about purported advances that may end up complicating and even compromising crucial parts of their medical care — including how their medical records are kept and how payers decide if they’re covered.

Let’s start with some kudos for dumpster-diving doctors in Canada who discovered flaws in hospitals’ disposal of supposedly confidential and legally protected patient health records. They went around unidentified facilities collecting from various bins a half ton of paper that doctors, nurses, and hospitals were ready to toss.

After examining the piles of paper, they found most private records had been properly handled. But thousands of documents also were not: They were improperly disposed of, and contained identifying or confidential patient treatment information, the researchers found. Though Canada’s patient privacy laws differ from those in the United States, they agree that patient health records must be guarded, and the researchers found violations of practice, policy, and potentially privacy laws.

acp-A1C-300x184What are patients supposed to do when medical experts feud over key disease metrics like the optimal blood sugar level  for diabetics?

Here we go again, figuring out medical figures:  That’s because the American College of Physicians and the American Diabetes Association are tussling over the much-watched blood sugar test — the hemoglobin A1c. It’s also known just as the A1C or the HbA1c, or glycohemoglobin test.

As the Mayo Clinic describes the A1C, it “reflects your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. Specifically, the A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar (glycated). The higher your A1C level, the poorer your blood sugar control and the higher your risk of diabetes complications.”

frail-300x150Although patient advocates long have pressed Big Medicine to eliminate unnecessary care — waste in the health care system that some experts estimate adds as much as $765 billion annually in needless costs — it may be past due for a public condemnation of a notably extreme example of this practice: The all too frequent, unhelpful surgeries for the old, many of whom are at the end of life.

Liz Szabo of the independent, nonprofit Kaiser Health News Service, and National Public Radio deserve credit for their report, detailing how 1 in 3 Medicare patients undergoes a serious procedure, “even though the evidence shows that many are more likely to be harmed than to benefit from it.”

As the story explains:

Nassar-Mich-AG-and-AP
His basic credentials would come under fire, but they were sufficient for the “doctor” to insinuate himself into major institutions, and, worse, into the lives of hundreds of girls and young women on whom he inflicted a tragic toll. His combination of enthusiasm — he was a rah-rah kind of guy— extreme controlling conduct, and horrific “treatments” never seemed to set off the red flags they should have.

Instead, Larry Nassar — an osteopath who served as an athletics and team caregiver for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University — got away for years with abusing adolescent females put under his  sway. He purportedly provided medical services to them, many in exclusive and demanding athletic camps where young participants were cut off from their friends, family, coaches, and personal physicians. He “treated” aspiring Olympians, at all hours of the night and day, alone and without any other adults around, in their bedrooms, on their beds — not in medical offices or athletic training facilities.

He enthusiastically told his patients, many of whom excelled at their sport because of their willingness to please adults and to be coached, that he could deal with their pains and injuries with what he termed pelvic manipulations in which he digitally penetrated them in their private parts. Without medical cause or justification, he conducted repeated and invasive “exams” of girls and young women’s genitals.

massgen-300x140Canadian researchers have come up with at least 2,500  reasons why elite surgeons should reconsider their own wishes and practices to protect patients undergoing hip surgeries from significant post-operative complications. They could do so by curbing even more their dual surgeries, in which they dash between two operating rooms.

A new study has found a 90 percent increase in the risk for surgical complications at one year when doctors repair hip fractures or replace hips in so-called overlapping surgeries.

The Boston Globe, starting in 2015, has raised major issues regarding the safety and effectiveness of simultaneous operations, conducted most often at major academic medical centers (such as Massachusetts General, shown above) and by leading practitioners.

alive-300x115Nick Tullier once was a handsome, strapping sheriff’s deputy in Baton Rouge, La. Then, in a blink, he and five others were gunned down by a former Marine and black separatist who had come from Missouri to Louisiana to kill cops. Tullier was one of three deputies who survived the attack.

What happened next to him is part of a series worth reading in the Houston Chronicle, a year-long dig the newspaper has dubbed “Alive Inside.” The work asks whether doctors and hospitals across the country have stayed current with medical advances that maybe, just might, possibly offer greater glimmers of hope to patients like Tullier who suffer traumatic brain injuries.

Such individuals, the Chronicle carefully says, may too quickly be deemed too injured to survive. Doctors, in sincere acts of perceived compassion, may be too fast to urge family and loved ones to withhold or halt medical services for the brain-injured, partly out of the pragmatic reality that their recovery prospects remain poor.

womenmds-300x200The profession of medicine gets mixed reviews in rolling back the centuries of  chauvinism, arrogance, and boorish behavior of top (male) doctors.  It’s now generally if grudgingly recognized that health care, though it may be a life-and-death practice, needn’t be a rude and obnoxious one. Nurses, many of them women but many men, too, shouldn’t be bullied and demeaned by doctors. It makes for mistakes and malpractice and bad patient outcomes, for one thing.

As health care leaders look around at mighty male leaders who are falling left and right in the entertainment, news and political industries, they may wish to look closely at their own talent and its treatment. Women doctors, for example, get a bad deal on a matter as basic as pay: They earn, on average, 20 percent less than men do, even within various specialties, data from 36,000 self-reporting MDs has found. Male vascular surgeons earn $89,000 more than their female counterparts, while male pediatric rheumatologists get about $45,000 more than their female peers do.

The American Medical Association has reported that only 12 percent of internal medicine, 1 percent of surgical, and 22 percent of obstetrics and gynecology department chairs at important, prestigious academic medical centers are women—figures that also are tough to reconcile because 83 percent of obstetrics and gynecology residents are women.

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