Articles Posted in Communication

obesity-300x161Although weight issues plague Americans as gravely as anywhere on the planet, obesity also has become a global woe, increasing sharply over the last three decades in 195 countries and afflicting an estimated 604 million adults and 108 million children—roughly 10 percent of the world’s population.

No nation on earth, even with the terrible toll that obesity takes in economic and health terms, has found a way to get its people skinnier and healthier: Weight woes are blowing up in disparate places like Saudi Arabia, Algeria, Egypt, Burkina Faso, Mali, and Guinea-Bissau, international researchers have reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. Obesity is now a major concern, too, for the people of China, Turkey, Venezuela, and Bhutan.

Public health experts worry about the skyrocketing numbers of overweight people around the planet because evidence shows obesity to be a major factor in heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other debilitating conditions.  These afflictions, combined with weight issues—including among those considered to be too heavy but not necessarily obese—contributed to four million deaths in 2015 alone, said the experts, participating as part of the Global Burden of Disease initiative.

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Although most Americans finally may be breaking out of cigarette smoking’s killer grip, Big Tobacco keeps inflicting terrible harm on some of the nation’s most vulnerable—the poor, uneducated, and those who live in rural areas.

The federal Centers for Disease Control has just offered its annual assessment on Americans’ smoking habits, providing some rare good news about most of us and especially kids: Cigarette smoking among the nation’s youth is diving to new lows, and the use of smokeless or e-cigarettes for “vaping” showed its first declines.

Anti-smoking campaigns may be working, persuading teens and many adults to avoid smoking or to quit the bad habit that has been proven to cause cancers and to contribute to heart disease and other damaging conditions, the CDC says. The agency also notes that youth vaping and smoking may have declined due to new age-based restrictions on product sales and advertising.

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Look out Baby Boomers and Gen Xers: Just when you or your elderly loved ones may be most vulnerable and needing nursing home care, the government is going back to allowing nursing home administrators to push a pile of documents for you to sign at you at admission time. And when you put your John Hancock on some of these, you will give away important legal protections.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, overseer of 1.5 million nursing home residents and more than $1 trillion in Medicare and Medicaid funding, has posted notice that, under Trump Administration leadership, it soon will reverse its predecessors’ plan to halt agreements that forced patients and their families to give up their right to sue. Instead, Trump officials will push them to the alternative legal process known as arbitration. Officials insist they will require nursing homes to make arbitration requirements simpler, and to ensure they’re written in plain English.

But, in keeping with a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in a Kentucky case, regulators are yielding to the nursing home industry’s aggressive lobbying and point of view that arbitration is simpler, easier, and will keep down costs.

bike-300x300As more Americans try to stay healthier and to beat the pains of commuting by car, bus, or light rail systems, many (including yours truly) have turned to bicycling. But as a result, non-fatal bike injuries have skyrocketed—especially for men and for riders older than 45—and two-wheel collision treatment has become expensive: The annual cost of medical care for bike crashes in 2013 alone exceeded $24.4 billion, double the amount for all occupational illnesses.

Those are findings of a multi-year study (1997-2013) of electronic records on 3.8 million non-fatal and 9,839 bike-related deaths, research published in Injury Prevention, an online specialty journal.

A key reason why the cost of cycling wrecks—including for emergency transport, hospital charges, rehabilitation, nursing home stays, and lost work and quality of life—has raced upwards: Bikers more than ever are mixing it up with cars on streets.  Road collisions accounted for just under half of biking injuries in 1997. They’re almost two-thirds of such wrecks now.

legionnaires-232x300Hospitals and nursing homes, by failing to properly maintain their water systems, may be putting older patients at high risk of an unusual form of pneumonia, with federal officials tracking 1 in 5 suspected or confirmed  cases of life-threatening Legionnaire’s Disease to health care facilities.

Anne Suchat, acting director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has urged caregivers to redouble their efforts to stamp out Legionella bacteria contamination in areas where poor maintenance may allow infections to flourish, including in water storage tanks, pipes, cooling systems, showers, sinks, and bathtubs. She said Legionnaire’s cases were too widespread, “deadly … and preventable.”

CDC researchers analyzed 2,809 of 6,079 Legionnaire’s cases nationwide in 2015 alone. They found 553 cases in 21 different and targeted jurisdictions, including Virginia, definitely or possibly occurring in a nursing home or hospital. The infections caused 66 deaths.

Florida_Supreme_Court_Building_2011-300x266As congressional Republicans pursue their counter factual campaign this week to strip patients of their rights to pursue legal redress for harms they suffer while seeking medical services, the Florida Supreme Court has sent a powerful message to federal lawmakers about the wrongheadedness of some of their key notions.

The justices in Tallahassee have repudiated state lawmakers’ assertions of the existence of a “malpractice crisis,” in which dire action is needed to ensure doctors can get affordable liability insurance and be sufficiently protected to practice good medicine.

They also have rejected caps on patients’ claims for pain and suffering, finding that these limits on “non-economic” damages violate constitutional rights to equal protection under the law, and “arbitrarily reduce damage awards for plaintiffs who suffer the most drastic injuries.”

girls-300x208It isn’t a teary topic fit only for moody young adult fiction and sudsy afternoon TV dramas: Depression afflicts as many as a third of girls, becoming a rising problem for some as early as age 11 and increasingly separating out as gender difference in the mental health between boys and girls.

The higher incidence of depression in girls—found in interview research with more than 100,000 young participants from 2009 to 2014 in the annual, statistically representative National Survey of Drug Use and Health—has raised concern among mental health experts. They note that depression can cause patients to struggle with relationships and school. It can lead some to suicide and may require sustained treatment for those with more serious cases.

Researchers could not explain why girls are more affected by depression, and they were surprised to find the earlier gender divergence, with it occurring at younger ages than had been tracked before. This tends to undercut existing psychological theories, they said, that depression in girls may be triggered by hormone changes or other significant life shifts that occur in their teens.

ohio-300x185With more than 4,000 overdose deaths last year alone and a fifth of its residents having received prescriptions for powerful painkillers, the state of Ohio has sued five Big Pharma companies, accusing them of mispresenting opioid drugs’ risks and fueling the medications’ epidemic abuse.

Ohio joins Mississippi in suing makers of increasingly lethal drugs like OxyContin and Percocet, whose addictive nature was hidden and downplayed by Big Pharma, critics say. The abuse of prescription opioids has fueled heroin use, with 33,000 Americans dying last year alone due to overdoses, federal and state health and law enforcement officials have said.

Fatal drug overdoses now exceed gun- or vehicle-deaths and they are matching the terrible tolls exacted at the height of the HIV-AIDS pandemic. Heartland America, and particularly white men, have been hard hit by the opioid drug crisis, with Ohio, Kentucky, New Hampshire and West Virginia recording the nation’s highest numbers of overdose deaths.

embarrass-300x172Health news readers look out: media organizations seem to be struggling with an outbreak of the whoopsies—as in, “Whoopsie, if we had more sense, we wouldn’t have put out the story you just read.”

The flare-up of embarrassing content, as chronicled well by the Healthnewsreview.org, a health information watchdog site, also seems to be a double problem for some media outlets that ironically have just warned their audiences about fake news.

As always, the dubious, low-value information concentrates on diet and nutrition topics — for instance, that small amounts of alcohol or coffee sway cancer risk or that eating chocolate makes your heart beat more regularly.

kid-belts-300x300Keeping kids safe is a constant challenge. Here are some new cautions from recent news reports:

Seat belts save lives—if used, and correctly

Although seat belts can be big lifesavers and a major way to protect passengers from injury, they don’t work if they’re not used—and correctly—especially with children. More than 4 in 10 youngsters killed in vehicular crashes between 2010 and 2014 were improperly restrained, particularly in vehicles’ front seat, or they weren’t buckled in at all, researchers found after studying National Highway Traffic Safety Administration data.

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