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Rigorous, reliable research on diet and nutrition is not common, so it’s worth paying close attention to the results of an $8-million, year-long study conducted at Stanford University with more than 600 test subjects. Its recommendations are filled — in a good way — with common sense and moderation.

The New York Times reported of the study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Nutrition Group and others, that its findings will help debunk some long-held notions about dieting — and some diet fads. Here’s the core of the newly published work’s key findings, according to the newspaper:

oxy-300x179Purdue Pharma, which built a multi-billion-dollar family empire, in part, by overcoming doctors’ resistance to prescribing powerful painkillers like its own powerhouse  OxyContin, has decided to curb its quarter-century of aggressive and controversial drug marketing — efforts that critics and lawsuits say helped fuel the nation’s opioid drug abuse epidemic.

The company has said that it will cut its sales staff by half and the 200 or so salespeople who stay no longer will haunt doctor’s offices to push OxyContin. Instead, the company said it will direct prescribers to materials on that drug, published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the office of the U.S. surgeon general.

“We have restructured and significantly reduced our commercial operation and will no longer be promoting opioids to prescribers,” the company, based in Stamford, Conn., said in a statement quoted by Reuters.

smoker-300x181If money really talks, could financial data persuade smokers, finally, to see the light and give up the habit, knowing that it racks up seven-figure lifetime costs per user in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia?

WalletHub, a West Coast personal finance site, has posted its crunching of data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Insurance Information Institute, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids,, Federal Reserve Economic Data (FRED), Kaiser Family Foundation and the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America.

Information from these sources was used to calculate the “per-person cost of smoking in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia [including] potential monetary losses — including both the lifetime and annual cost of a cigarette pack per day, health care expenditures, income losses and other costs — brought on by smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.”

oprah1-go-225x300Oprah Winfrey’s recent rousing broadcast speech — both in accepting an entertainment industry group’s lifetime achievement award and denouncing sexism and sexual harassment in Hollywood — also opened the door to a reconsideration of how this talented, smart, accomplished, powerful, and wealthy celebrity icon long has helped to foster a barrage of health and medical humbug, spreading it far and wide in popular culture.

As Stat, a health and information site, recapped about Winfrey:

She connected a cancer patient to ‘junk science,’ a Washington Post analysis says. She promoted charlatans on her show, according to Slate. Former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee put out a statement … attacking Winfrey for ‘giving a platform to anti-vaccination campaigners and other dangerous health quackery.’

The new year is bubbling with numerous reports about  “raw water.” Enthusiasts are flocking to outlets — in Oregon, Maine, San Diego, San Francisco, and the Silicon Valley — for unfiltered, untreated, and unsterilized H2O from springs. They’re paying dearly, for example $36.99 for a 2.5-gallon glass orb of “off the grid” Live Water from a West Coast vendor.

Devotees insist “raw water” tastes better. They contend it’s healthier when free of chemicals, like purifying chlorine and tooth- and bone-protecting fluoride, and replete with “probiotics,” bacteria and microscopic life such as algae that they claim are beneficial.

Such claims fly in the face of at least a century of public health experience and progress, a period in which science-based hygiene has helped to rid the nation of epidemics due to water-borne bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Cholera, typhoid fever, dysentery, and hepatitis A no longer flourish in water supplies, killing thousands annually as these banes once did. It goes without a thought for most Americans that they can turn the spigot at home or the office, drink freely and deeply and not end up getting deathly ill — risks that may be posed by “raw” water.

obamacare1-300x154Millions of ordinary Americans closed out 2017 with a powerful message to the Trump Administration and GOP lawmakers about the nation’s health care. Despite efforts to make it harder to re-enlist for insurance plans, consumers signed up in strong fashion for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. Their actions spoke loudly against the claim that Obamacare is dead. Nope, it’s popular and in high demand.

That 8.8. million Americans had sought Obamacare by the Dec. 15 general program sign-up deadline came as a pleasant surprise to ACA supporters. They were glum because the administration had halved the application time and slashed the money for advertising and other outreach — programs that proponents had considered necessary so those covered on ACA exchanges wouldn’t only be the sickest and oldest Americans but also the healthy and young. Administration officials also said little or nothing to support or promote Obamacare sign-ups, while the President and GOP lawmakers spent the first year of a new Congress and administration assailing the ACA, including a failed effort to repeal and replace it.

Partisans in Congress, as part of a more than $1.5 trillion bill to change the nation’s tax system, killed the ACA’s individual mandate — the requirement that all Americans show, as part of the annual tax returns, that they had health insurance or face penalties. That move, independent and nonpartisan analysts have said, will mean 13 million Americans will lack health coverage by 2027, and average health insurance premiums will go up by 10 percent each year for the next decade. With the prospect that the tax bill and the GOP budget plan will force billions of dollars in cuts, too, to Medicare and Medicaid, and with the unpopular individual mandate gone, President Trump has claimed that he and the Republican Congress have killed Obamacare.

vaper-300x230Big Tobacco not only wrote the playbook on how to deceive the public about the dangers of cigarette smoking, its representatives are adding new pages daily now on how to make electronic or e-cigarettes and so-called vaping seem safe, even when evidence mounts that this isn’t fully true.

It’s good to see that the Verge, an online information site that clearly has a younger audience, has put out a deep dig on the duplicitous campaign by vaping firms to make their “smokeless” products not only seem harmless but cool. They’re doing so, in part, by assailing public health experts who disagree with them, and who find that vaping can be a gateway for the young to cancer-causing cigarette smoking and use of other harmful tobacco products. Big Vape, as Big Tobacco did before, also is bankrolling purported experts and supposed research to make its case that e-cigarettes offer a more healthful alternative to help cigarette smokers lessen their nasty habit.

As the Verge has reported:

northam-300x228Millions of Americans may qualify for federal help in paying for the health insurance, but they must sign up for coverages on exchanges set up under the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, by Dec. 15. Doing so, starting with a visit to, has become a surprisingly popular and perhaps a strongly political act.

That’s at least one way to look at it after voters, led by Virginians, sent a big electoral rebuke to President Trump and congressional Republicans over their failed congressional assault and continuing efforts to repeal and replace the ACA, especially its increasingly popular expansion of Medicaid. Its programs benefit the poor, young, old, chronically and mentally ill—and growing numbers of working poor and middle-class Americans, too.

The punditry has flowed since Tuesday’s elections in Virginia, New Jersey, Maine, and elsewhere. Virginia voters not only trashed Ed Gillespie, the Republican candidate who was supported by Trump, and elected Ralph Northam, a Democrat, a pediatrician, and a veteran who was the state’s lieutenant governor (see photo), they also churned the membership of the state legislature. Control of the House is up to recounts in a few tight races.

Marijuana-206x300Let’s give them their just deserts and dispatch them with alacrity. In this week’s hokum alert:

epipen-300x119Big Pharma’s rapacious profit-seeking can seem to hit no bounds, even if it afflicts millions: Just consider what federal and state regulators are mulling about the makers of a popular anti-allergy therapy and those who supply a critical diabetes medication.

The federal Food and Drug Administration has replied to Bloomberg News Service that, so far, in 2017, it has recorded 228 reports of EpiPen or EpiPen Jr. failures, and the failure of EpiPens to deploy correctly has been cited in seven deaths through mid-September.

The agency said it is monitoring closely these “adverse event complaints.” These are unconfirmed reports that do not necessarily tie a product to a harm. But they might constitute sufficient grounds to investigate further and to potentially order product recalls, though, so far, the FDA says it believes patients can keep using EpiPens on the market without worry.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
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