Articles Posted in Surgery

bwhospitalBecause money makes such a difference in health care in the United States, what happens when it’s no object? The results aren’t pretty, a prestigious Boston hospital has found. It rolled out the red carpet and penthouse suites for a Saudi prince who stayed for seven months of therapy for a drug-resistant infection.

His lavish ways, however, ended up tainting the institution’s best practices, resulting in internal and Massachusetts state investigations. The Boston Globe said the episode, in which the unidentified prince and his entourage made unusual care demands and lavished gifts on staff in violation of hospital policies, shows the risks of so-called VIP care.

The paper said the post-mortem of the royal treatment found that: medical staff failed to adhere to best practices in wearing protective gowns when treating the princely patient who found the attire “off-putting” and dirty; nurses and others were accused of mishandling narcotics, giving them to members of the royal entourage and not administering them to the patient himself.

CR-TOC-Cover-05-2016California leads the nation in its number of practicing physicians─and some of those doctors are so awful they’re dangerous, Consumer Reports has found in its deep dive into state licensing boards and MD discipline. The magazine, in a cover story headlined “What you don’t know about your doctor could hurt you,” compiles some ghastly illustrations of bad doctors, including:

  • A pediatrician with a fetish who fondled the feet of patients’ moms during exams;
  • An ob-gyn who surgically removed the wrong ovary from a patient;

We all owe our individual and collective health not just to ourselves but to any army of Samaritans — our friends, families, colleagues, caregivers, and the many medical professionals who practice at the highest levels of skill and compassion.

It’s tempting, especially when immersed in the ways that health care in this nation falls short, to turn from healthy skepticism to corrosive cynicism. But for this holiday in particular, let’s all give special thanks for those who practice the healing arts. Many of them will leave loved ones and work long hours over Thanksgiving, and not just because of a fee or a charge but to improve the lives of the sick and needy.

With all the adverse, if not hostile reaction Americans are showing in recent days to people beyond our shores, it’s also worth reminding ourselves that the call to help humanity truly is deep and universal. We can learn and be humbled by what others accomplish, including in health and medicine, with resources so much more spare than we can marshal, spending as we do, and, as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development notes, at the pinnacle for healthcare and not always seeing equivalent, positive outcomes.

Thankfully, most doctors are honest, but a pattern of greed and dishonesty has popped up with disturbing frequency around the country: heart specialists putting permanent devices into healthy hearts with no medical justification.  It’s happened in California, Maryland, New Mexico and now in a Chicago suburb, Munster, Indiana.

This town of 23,000,  30 miles southeast of Chicago, now has 293 patients asserting in lawsuits that a trio of heart specialists performed needless procedures, the New York Times reports.

State Medicaid officials, the Times says, have launched an investigation and federal authorities also may be probing the physicians, who make up Munster’s most popular cardiology practice and the highest-paid heart doctors by Medicare reimbursement.

If any work places should be distraction-free, a short list would include the command post for launching nuclear arms, the control tower of a busy airport and the operating room. We have no information about the first two, but a recent study shows that the people working in the surgical suite might be monitoring their smartphones instead of monitoring you.

As KaiserHealthNews.org (KHN) and the Washington Post reported, “Cellphone use is not generally restricted in the operating room, but some experts say the time for rules has come. In interviews, many described co-workers’ texting friends and relatives from the surgical suite. Some spoke of colleagues who hide a phone in a drawer and check it when they think no one is watching.”

Sometimes a member of the surgical team might be reviewing pertinent medical data on the device, but too often, they’re being used for decidedly nonmedical purposes. As Dwight Burney, an orthopedic surgeon, told KHN/Post, “Sometimes it’s just stuff like shopping online or checking Facebook. The problem is that it does lead to distraction.”

Research into the healing properties of music isn’t new, but the field of study recently was launched a bit farther with substantial evidence that listening to music before, during or after a surgical procedure helps patients by reducing pain, anxiety and the need for pain medication.

The results of the research published in Lancet involved about 7,000 subjects, and is considered the most comprehensive review so far of how music helps people cope with medical adventures.

The meta analysis (in which the results of multiple studies are reviewed and analyzed) included 72 published, randomized trials examining the effect of music on postoperative recovery in adult patients undergoing various surgical procedures. It was compared with more traditional forms of clinical care or other nondrug interventions, such as massage.

Patients who suspect malpractice after they’ve had an unforeseen injury from a surgical procedure quickly learn that the operating room works on a basic “honor system” for reporting errors. If something goes wrong, the surgeon is required to describe the event in his or her dictated report of the operation. Of course, that lets the surgeon control what gets put on paper.

Now there is a budding movement to have cameras in operating rooms record what happens and save the recordings for possible use later — both to educate professionals and as potential legal evidence.

The Washington Post has an article describing a bill introduced in the Wisconsin legislature to require such recordings. The man behind the move is the brother of a patient who died from too much propofol, the same anesthetic drug that killed Michael Jackson.

An impressive study published last week strongly suggests that when it comes to a certain kind of breast cancer, early, aggressive intervention has no effect on a patient’s survival 10 years later.

The research in JAMA Oncology reviewed the records of more than 100,000 women. After being diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), the women’s overall chances of dying were a little more than 3 in 100 over two decades. Survival rates for women who received treatment beyond a lumpectomy (to remove abnormal cells) were no different from those who had no additional interventions.

The results of the study were widely reported last week. One news source, the Washington Post, wrote, “The findings add to concerns that the ability to detect these lesions through mammograms may be leading to unnecessary mastectomies.”

Although some people in cardiac distress need invasive procedures to survive, some heart treatments are overused, and the cost continues to mount.

As explained by patient safety advocate John James in his August newsletter, performing angiography on and inserting stents in patients with stable heart disease not only wastes money, but can be unsafe.

An angiogram is an X-ray of blood vessels made visible after the patient is injected with radioactive dye. It’s often prescribed to detect damaged blood vessels and problems affecting blood flow. After an angiogram locates an occluded coronary artery, a stent, or tiny, self-inflating tube can be inserted to open it, and keep it open.

A newly launched website tracks the complication rates of about 17,000 surgeons across the country. The idea is to help patients choose the person who’s going to operate on them based on his or her safety and performance records in comparison with their peers.

The database, Surgeon Scorecard, was established by ProPublica, the nonprofit investigative news site. It analyzed 2.3 million hip and knee replacements, spinal fusions, gallbladder removals, prostate resections and prostate removals done between 2009 and 2013 on patients in Medicare, which pays for two out of every five U.S. hospital stays.

Complications directly related to the operations included infections, blood clots, misaligned orthopedic devices and uncontrolled bleeding. ProPublica counted only cases in which the patient died in the hospital or had a complication requiring readmission within 30 days.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
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