Articles Posted in Research Studies

HouseGregoryHouse-276x300Doctors, nurses, and hospitals should stop ignoring colleagues who act like jerks because obnoxious physicians—think of  Dr. Gregory House, the TV internist—may hurt patients, especially in surgery.

Researchers, who published a study in the JAMA Surgery, looked at two years of quality care data from seven medical centers, involving 800 surgeons and 32,000 adult patients. They also had information on physicians with “unsolicited patient observations,” meaning complaints from those undergoing care and their friends and families.

Stat, the online health information site, summarizes what the researchers found:

ryanMembers of Congress are home in their districts for a week-long break, and many lawmakers are expected to get an earful from voters upset over many issues at the start of the Trump Administration, especially this: What the heck’s going on with health care?

Republicans have insisted for years now—counter-factually, as the evidence has amply demonstrated—that they had a cheaper, better, more inclusive alternative to the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. The promised to repeal the ACA on the day they gained control of Congress and the White House. That hasn’t happened. Nor has the GOP proffered its vaunted replacement. Instead, the party had talked in recent days about an ACA repair.

But under fire from their most conservative party members, Republican leaders have thrown up what they call an outline of Trumpcare. The GOP has moved from lots of R’s—repeal, replace, and repair—to some C’s and D’s: Costly, callous, divisive, and cruel. Those are some ways their retread plan elements (dubbed “déjà vu all over again” in one report) could be described. The outline still faces major challenges, not the least of which is whether a chaotic White House and a lumpen Congress can conduct the nation’s business and enact public policy.

ear-187x300Traffic, rock concerts, leaf blowers, and blaring head phones — these are among the many noise sources that have played a part in 40 million American adults suffering from hearing losses not caused by their work conditions, Uncle Sam says.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based on a study of more than 3,500 people who underwent tests and questioning, estimates that a quarter of Americans ages 20 to 69 suffer hearing impairment that constitutes “a significant, often unrecognized health problem.”

This diminished capacity, especially if untreated, can lead to “decreased social, psychological, and cognitive functioning,” the CDC says. Its study also reported that:

marijuana-smoking-131013-300x200Although marijuana is marching toward legalization across the United States, expectant moms may wish to think long and hard still about smoking or ingesting a substance that has become as ubiquitous in some households as aspirin or a bottle of chardonnay. The New York Times has delved into this discussion, even as other news outlets recently have provided parental warnings about hype over apps for baby care and tossing some toxic homeopathic teething remedies.

Pot? Not for expectant moms

Let’s turn first, and not be blue noses about it, to why moms would consider pot while pregnant. Data show that few do (an estimated 4 percent of more than 200,000 women in one 12-year sample — though the number had doubled in recent time). For younger women, the answer may be, just because. They don’t equate it with risk but with recreation. They say they try to be cautious with it, just as they might curtail their alcohol consumption but still have a rare drink. Older and expectant moms may use pot, as many women do, because they find it helps with depression, anxiety, stress, pain, nausea and vomiting.

harlanYes, there can be progressive steps in health care—and with all the controversy and change going on in the sector it’s worth spotlighting some of these:

Patients should get access to own health records, researchers say

  • Three researchers—Dr. Harlan Krumholz of Yale Medical School (photo right), Connecticut lawyer Jennifer L. Cox, and Yale student Austin W. Jaspers—deserve credit for publishing a pointed opinion piece in the JAMA Internal Medicine detailing the costs and needless obstacles patients confront when they want copies of their own health records. As Krumholz told Reuters of the study’s message about excessive records fees charged by doctors and hospitals:  “Higher costs are a higher barrier for people to get their own information. Without that information it is not possible to correct errors in the record, get informed second opinions, donate your data to research – or share with others what is happening with your care.”  That’s spot on, doctor, as I have written recently and in my book,  The Life You Save: Nine Steps to Getting the Best Medical Care, and Avoiding the Worst. Uncle Sam has stepped in and tried to make it easier and more affordable for patients to get their own records, which Krumholz and company point out should be even more available now that they are digitized (he’s working on software to help, too). But states aren’t doing enough to help, except for Kentucky, which requires a free first copy on request, he and his colleagues say. My firm’s site contains information that may be helpful to those struggling to get their records. Here’s hoping that doctors, hospitals, and other caregiving facilities read the Jaspers, Cox, and Krumholz viewpoint, and, because it appears in one of their publications and Krumholz is a physician-researcher of growing influence, they heed it more.

Kellyanne_Conway-214x300Don’t  tune out because conventional wisdom suggests it’s “just” a program for the poor. The partisans’ planned push for changes to Medicaid could have significant consequences for millions of Americans, many of them middle-class, older, disabled, and sick.

The Medicaid changes, as various officials like counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, have described them without detail for now, also could stagger state and local governments’ finances, including the already strapped District of Columbia, which might see a half-billion- to billion-dollar hole blown in its budgets.

Although significant and merited public attention has focused on the GOP’s crusade to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, and especially how it affects health insurance, many Americans may not be as riveted by what happens to Medicaid. Republicans have reviled for years now a part of the ACA’s reforms that expanded the government program, but only, as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court decision, if states agreed. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia did so, 19 did not. This meant that 11 million Americans, most of them the working poor, received health care coverage via Medicaid.

sen-collins-288x300Bill_Cassidy_headshot-237x300Will the partisans who promised and now can’t deliver on a blitzkrieg to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, end up deeply dividing the country in even more disturbing ways?

GOP leaders, after conceding that they cannot legislate their hoped-for Obamacare replacement until much later this year (reversing their pledge to do so on Day One of the new Administration), huddled in Philadelphia, nervously, to develop strategies and tactics. As they develop “Trumpcare,” they’re confronting growing and significant restiveness about the potential destructiveness of their current course, including the possibility their repeal may cost 43,000 American lives annually.

Meantime, the health care policy proposals that have floated up, including the Patient Freedom Act of 2017 from Republican senators Susan Collins of Maine and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, raise as many questions as they offer, including:

skepticism-image-197x300At one point, medical experts recommended that physicians aggressively treat patients 60 and older so the top number of their blood pressure readings ran as close as possible to 140. Maybe not so, anymore. For a while, physicians were told to treat patients so their “good cholesterol” increased significantly. But maybe this approach doesn’t protect against heart disease after all. Pediatricians once warned parents to protect newborns by not exposing them to certain allergens, especially peanuts. If you haven’t had your head buried in the sand, that counsel, of course, has just changed 180 degrees.

Thanks are due to Aaron E. Carroll, a pediatrician, health research and policy expert, and columnist with the New York Times “Upshot” feature, for reminding — yet again, as repetition is the Mother of Learning — that medical news must be taken in by patient-consumers with a “dose of healthy skepticism.” This he says is especially true about reports on nutrition.

I’ve written about the harms that result from hype and the many, sometimes dramatic reverses in health and medical news. I’ve pointed out that there are accessible resources, such as the excellent healthnewsreview.org, to watchdog coverage of medical science and so-called advances. I’ve suggested that patient-consumers look closely at key elements in research stories, including how the work was done, how long the study ran, whether its data is visible and if it was published in a reputable medical journal. This will help savvy readers look askance, even at pieces in quality news sites — such as recent articles touting turmeric or eating lots of hot peppers.

Female_black_symbol-200x300Modern medicine isn’t addressing women’s distinctive health care needs as optimally as needed, with research further showing it may be time to dial down expectations about breast cancer screening, while heightening physicians’ awareness and best practices in eliminating gender biases.

Women also may want to keep close tabs on how changes with the Affordable Care Act affect them, and they may be well-served to remind themselves about Texas’ sudden surge in maternal deaths and one of health care’s major, gender-based debacles in hormone treatments for females.

Over-treatment tied to mammograms

oxycontin-150x150Big Pharma stayed in an unpleasant spotlight last week, with developments including:

How OxyContin reformulation may have hiked heroin-related deaths

A  new study has helped to explain the nationwide surge in heroin-related deaths, and how these likely are the unintended consequence of reformulations of OxyContin, a powerful, addictive painkiller. The study by the University of Pennsylvania and the RAND Corp., published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, scrutinized state-level data both on OxyContin abuse and heroin fatalities, which tripled from 3,000 in 2010 to 10,500 in 2014. Areas of highest misuse of the prescription painkiller dovetailed with those where heroin-related deaths spiked.

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