Articles Posted in Preventive Care

Apple-Juice-286x300For parents who struggle to ensure their kids eat right, news reports in recent days have offered some notable insights:  They may wish to pack school lunches with whole fruit, and be wary of youngsters’ over-consumption of fruit juices. They also may want to cast a skeptical eye on claims for “organic” milk.

And, even as school food programs seem to be making nutritional headway, moms and dads may need to keep a close eye on the lunch rooms due to Trump Administration policy changes.

Although many grownups rightly have sought to exile sugary sweet drinks, especially sodas, from youngsters’ diets, researchers say fruit juice should be substituted sparingly. It should be an occasional treat, not a big part of every meal.

vaper-300x112The Trump Administration has sent disturbing signals on whether it will keep Big Tobacco from hooking more Americans on high-tech, nicotine-addictive products—so-called e-cigarettes used, especially by the young, for “vaping,” as well as cigars and hookahs.

The federal Food and Drug Administration, almost exactly a year ago, announced it would crack down, in particular, on e-cigarettes, forcing their makers to submit them for regulatory approval and oversight. Uncle Sam also barred makers from targeting the young with certain kinds of product advertising and giveaways. E-cigarettes still cannot be sold to consumers younger than 18 and free samples are still barred.

But the Washington Post has reported that the administration is delaying key aspects of its rules on vaping, cigars, and hookahs so newly installed federal health officials can get up to speed in their posts.

cdc-school-265x300There may be more science and policy impact than many parents, teachers, and coaches realize when they joke that teen-agers can be so slow to mature now they’re almost like aliens. Young people, in fact, may need distinctive school schedules, courts, and reproductive awareness programs—all based on building research about adolescent brain and body development.

School start times and growing kids’ sleep needs

Let’s start with one of the common flashpoints in many households with teens: getting up and to school on time. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine has just joined with the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in recommending that middle and high schools start the day no earlier than 8:30 a.m.

Prostate-e1492269148971-483x1024A burst of bad headlines and not so great news reports may have confused some men. But to put it in lay terms:  The use of the common test for routine prostate cancer screening got a dim grade of C for many men, up from a dismal D, in a re-evaluation by independent experts who assess the nation’s preventive medical services.

That blunt review of regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, despite some reports to the contrary, keeps with how the influential U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPTF) looked at annual  screening for this most common form of cancer for men when it issued its first guidelines in 2012, notes healthnewsreview.org.

The health information site says the USPTF earlier had surprised many, downgrading routine prostate cancer screening to a D, and noting, “There is moderate or high certainty that the service has no net benefit or that the harms outweigh the benefits.” It now says it rates a C for many men younger than 70, meaning physicians should “Offer or provide this service for selected patients depending on individual circumstances,” and that “There is at least moderate certainty that the net benefit is small.”

Foxx-275x300Call it creepy or maybe a too-early April Fool’s joke. What else can be said about a Republican-backed measure, advancing in the House of Representatives, that puts Big Brother in charge— big time —in many workplaces via so-called wellness programs?

It’s called the  “Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act.” This Orwell-inspired bill,  pushed by North Carolina Republican Congresswoman Virginia Foxx, gives employers scary control over their workers. Employees who participate in job-related health programs can be compelled to undergo genetic tests, and to provide the results to employers, albeit in supposedly anonymized fashion. If they fail to do so, they could face thousands of dollars in fines.

Disclosure of extremely personal, private medical information has been barred by the 2008 Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, aka GINA. It arose partly after a 1998 court case, in which clerical and administrative workers were allowed to sue their employer for requiring testing for “highly private and sensitive medical genetic information such as syphilis, sickle cell trait, and pregnancy” without their consent or knowledge during a general employee health exam. GINA has been key in blocking employers from tapping into genetic and other confidential medical information as part of increasingly popular but largely ineffective workplace wellness programs. Because most Americans, more than 155 million of them, get their health insurance at work, many companies have launched and expanded such programs as way to reduce their coverage costs.

cdc-logo-300x226When it comes to the nation’s health, the Trump Administration and the GOP-dominated Congress seem determined to prove they know how to do penny-wise and pound-foolish. They’re amply demonstrating this with proposed slashes in the nation’s basic budget for public health. They’re calling for a $1 billion cut for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, notably in the agency’s funding to combat bioterrorism and outbreaks of disease, as well as to battle smoking and to provide critical medical services like immunizations. Their target is the Prevention and Public Health Fund, set up under the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. With the ACA under fire by partisans who want to repeal and replace it, the fund was already imperiled. GOP lawmakers, determined to cut domestic spending, seem disinclined to come up with substitute sums.

Andy Harris, a Maryland Republican congressman, physician, and House appropriations health subcommittee member, has been quoted as calling the public health money, “a slush fund.” He argued that, “It’s been used by the secretary [of health and human services] for whatever the secretary wants. It’s a misnomer to call it the Prevention and Public Health Fund, because it’s been used for other things, and it’s about time we eliminated it.”

The Obama Administration did embarrass Congress by tapping the fund to provide emergency aid last summer to Florida, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, and other states battling tropical infections, including Zika and dengue fever. Congress took a long recess vacation, as states clamored for help for mosquito eradication and vaccine development to deal with Zika, a virus that can cause severe birth defects and other harms.

ear-187x300Traffic, rock concerts, leaf blowers, and blaring head phones — these are among the many noise sources that have played a part in 40 million American adults suffering from hearing losses not caused by their work conditions, Uncle Sam says.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, based on a study of more than 3,500 people who underwent tests and questioning, estimates that a quarter of Americans ages 20 to 69 suffer hearing impairment that constitutes “a significant, often unrecognized health problem.”

This diminished capacity, especially if untreated, can lead to “decreased social, psychological, and cognitive functioning,” the CDC says. Its study also reported that:

nhlDo the leaders of professional hockey need to spend some time in the penalty box? It might seem so based on a report in the New York Times that the National Hockey League, as it battles its own players in court over the harms caused by repetitive head injuries, is adopting the dubious legal playbook used by pro football, Big Tobacco and Big Sugar.

The $4-billion-a-year NHL, it seems, has taken off its mitts, thrown them on the ice, and is throwing blows to challenge the ever-mounting, evidence-based research that finds that concussions are detrimental to brain health and can lead to the disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE.

The National Football League, after years of CTE denial, including efforts to undercut its medical science and to attack its researchers, conceded that repeated head trauma harmed its players, and pro football settled with them for more than $1 billion.

Kellyanne_Conway-214x300Don’t  tune out because conventional wisdom suggests it’s “just” a program for the poor. The partisans’ planned push for changes to Medicaid could have significant consequences for millions of Americans, many of them middle-class, older, disabled, and sick.

The Medicaid changes, as various officials like counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, have described them without detail for now, also could stagger state and local governments’ finances, including the already strapped District of Columbia, which might see a half-billion- to billion-dollar hole blown in its budgets.

Although significant and merited public attention has focused on the GOP’s crusade to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, and especially how it affects health insurance, many Americans may not be as riveted by what happens to Medicaid. Republicans have reviled for years now a part of the ACA’s reforms that expanded the government program, but only, as a result of a U.S. Supreme Court decision, if states agreed. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia did so, 19 did not. This meant that 11 million Americans, most of them the working poor, received health care coverage via Medicaid.

skepticism-image-197x300At one point, medical experts recommended that physicians aggressively treat patients 60 and older so the top number of their blood pressure readings ran as close as possible to 140. Maybe not so, anymore. For a while, physicians were told to treat patients so their “good cholesterol” increased significantly. But maybe this approach doesn’t protect against heart disease after all. Pediatricians once warned parents to protect newborns by not exposing them to certain allergens, especially peanuts. If you haven’t had your head buried in the sand, that counsel, of course, has just changed 180 degrees.

Thanks are due to Aaron E. Carroll, a pediatrician, health research and policy expert, and columnist with the New York Times “Upshot” feature, for reminding — yet again, as repetition is the Mother of Learning — that medical news must be taken in by patient-consumers with a “dose of healthy skepticism.” This he says is especially true about reports on nutrition.

I’ve written about the harms that result from hype and the many, sometimes dramatic reverses in health and medical news. I’ve pointed out that there are accessible resources, such as the excellent healthnewsreview.org, to watchdog coverage of medical science and so-called advances. I’ve suggested that patient-consumers look closely at key elements in research stories, including how the work was done, how long the study ran, whether its data is visible and if it was published in a reputable medical journal. This will help savvy readers look askance, even at pieces in quality news sites — such as recent articles touting turmeric or eating lots of hot peppers.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information