Articles Posted in Medical Error

doc-sleep-300x225Must doctors be absolutely impervious to common sense improvements in the way they train their own? Their bullheadedness has reemerged with the revisited decision by a major academic credentialing group to allow medical residents yet again to work 24-hour shifts.

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education clearly was on the defensive when it issued its memo on residents’ learning and working hours, guidance that academic medical centers and hospitals nationwide will rely on in setting workplace standards for the young doctors in whose hands so many patients will put their lives. The council noted that it had established a high-level task force to reconsider criticisms of residents’ stress and overwork and how this might imperil patient care, responding to an early rollback of shift hours:

“… The Task Force has determined that the hypothesized benefits associated with the changes made to first-year resident scheduled hours in 2011 have not been realized, and the disruption of team-based care and supervisory systems has had a significant negative impact on the professional education of the first-year resident, and effectiveness of care delivery of the team as a whole. It is important to note that 24 hours is a ceiling, not a floor. Residents in many specialties may never experience a 24-hour clinical work period. Individual specialties have the flexibility to modify these requirements to make them more restrictive as appropriate, and in fact, some already do. As in the past, it is expected that emergency medicine and internal medicine will make individual requirements more restrictive.”

hospital-bed-300x144Although hospitals continue to try to shrug it off, the damning evidence is building that far more Americans die of preventable causes in their care than previously thought, and “approximately 200,000” such deaths each year in the United States is “not unreasonable” as an estimate.

Those are the top-line findings from a team of doctors and public health experts who have published new research in the Journal of Patient Safety. Theirs was the fourth study in recent times to try to quantify what one of the research groups has described as potentially the “third leading cause of death in the United States,” those from medical error, especially occurring in hospitals.

A year ago, the Heartland Health Research Institute looked at Iowa and six surrounding states to assess what experts call preventable adverse events, and examining the existing studies that might offer national insights on the issue. These researchers found that it was reasonable to conclude that “250,000 patients [die] annually in U.S. hospitals due to preventable mistakes.”

newborninhospital_mhi_default-300x199Some new cautions have been issued on some key aspects of children’s health care. The federal government is increasing its warnings on anesthetic use for children and expectant moms, while a newspaper investigation is raising issues with common newborn screenings and their inconsistency and inaccuracy. Meantime, a health news site is adding to questions about a much-touted program to reduce head trauma harms in kids’ athletics.

FDA warnings on anesthetics for babies, expectant moms

Let’s start with the federal Food and Drug Administration cautions on “repeated and lengthy use of general anesthetic and sedation drugs” with children younger than 3 and pregnant women. The agency says it has been studying potential harms of these powerful medications for these two groups since 1999, and will label almost a dozen common anesthetics and sedation drugs with new warnings.

IVThree Washington, D.C.-area teaching hospitals have ranked in the lowest-scoring group nationally on preventing infections when their patients are hooked up to central lines, intravenous tubes that supply fluids, medications, and nutrients to those in dire need. Two institutions in the region rated highly.

Consumer Reports deserves credit for its continuing reporting on hospital acquired infections (HAIs), a scourge that in 2011 afflicted 650,000 already ailing Americans and which contributed to 75,000 deaths. The advocacy group says 27,000 patients were felled with central line infections in 2015, with a quarter of these especially sick and frail individuals dying of them. Treating patients for central line infections cost on average $46,000—more than for any other HAI.

The area teaching hospitals that the magazine ranked poorly, based on an analysis of federal data from 2011 to 2015, were: George Washington University Hospital, Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring, and Howard University Hospital. The two high-ranking institutions were: MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center in Baltimore and Sentara Norfolk (Va.) General Hospital.

seqcore_slider_img_resizedAlthough doctors and hospitals report potentially sunnier news by the day about novel cancer treatments, it’s also worth keeping in mind that difficult obstacles like data misinterpretation still must be worked out to avoid endangering patients. The therapies themselves as well as cancer care overall can be crushing in their costs. And some experts also are raising questions about Big Pharma and the independence of advocacy groups that patients and families often turn to when diagnosed with different cancers.

Let’s start with the ray of optimism that the Washington Post reported for patients with advanced lung cancer. It kills more than 160,000 Americans annually, and isn’t diagnosed often until it reaches late stages. Lung cancer, the Post says, retains its stigma because of its proven link to smoking. Both smokers—and nonsmokers who also may develop the disease for many other complex reasons—are blamed for causing their own illness.

Oncologists have begun to look at this cancer not as one but many different disease, and the paper says immunotherapy may improve outcomes for a slice of late-stage patients, halting the disease’s spread and without the significant side-effects of current chemo or radiation treatments. In immunotherapy, patients’ cancers are tested to determine which drugs may best target and destroy tumors by unleashing the bodies’ own disease-fighting (immunity) systems.

SouthDakota-StateSeal.svgSouth Dakotans will need their state lawmakers’ help now to pry open physicians’ iron grip on secret decisions about which doctors get to practice in hospitals and why. That’s because the state’s Supreme Court ruled this vital information must be kept confidential, even if releasing it would serve a wider good of disclosing possible criminal or fraudulent conduct.

The high court ducked its potential role in helping more than 30 patients who claim they were mangled in excruciating, needless surgeries performed by Allen Sossan, an osteopath with an easily discovered criminal past and a checkered medical practice record in the area around Yankton, S.D. I’ve written about this case before.

Several South Dakota hospitals gave Sossan practice privileges after his credentials were reviewed by physician committees, which, since have fought mightily to keep secret what they knew and when they knew it about him. Sossan since has been indicted for providing false information to medical licensing authorities. The convicted burglar and check kiter apparently has fled the country and may be back in his native Iran.

SupremeCourtSealSouth Dakota’s highest court has been asked to reject hospitals’ attempts to keep secret why a doctor, who also is a convicted burglar with a checkered medical past that could have easily been uncovered, passed a peer review that permitted him to perform brutal, excruciating, and unnecessary spinal surgeries on dozens of patients.

A lower court rejected the sweeping claims by the hospitals that the reviews can never be disclosed. The judge said that indications of crimes or fraud, as raised by evidence-based malpractice lawsuits, are sufficient reason to breach confidentiality protections shielding vital insights into how hospitals judge physician performance and permit doctors to practice in their institutions.

More than 30 patients have sued surgeon Allen Sossan. He is a convicted felon, who had changed his name, and who apparently has fled to Iran. Patients assert he caused them great pain and maimed them with unnecessary, complex back procedures. Further, patients have sued more than a dozen doctors who reviewed his credentials and granted him privileges at Avera Sacred Heart and Lewis & Clark Specialty Hospital, both in Yankton, S.D.

WristbandAs American medicine grows ever more complex, a basic of care is getting risky short shrift: Hospitals may be failing to protect their patients’ safety by ensuring they are clearly identified and their medical records don’t get mixed up.

The Wall Street Journal provides a list of horror stories about wrong patient IDs and record mix-ups. These were detailed in a “deep dive” by the ECRI Institute, a nonprofit patient safety research group that studied more than 7,600 reported “wrong patient errors” at more than 181 health care organizations between January 2013 and July 2015. The mistakes, shared under a law that allows their reporting to federal authorities without liability, likely were only a fraction of the many more that occurred.

ECRI found that: clinicians failed to resuscitate a patient in cardiac arrest because they mistook him for another patient who had a do-not revive order in his chart; a patient who was not supposed to fed, due to a mix-up, got a meal tray and choked; an infant, confused for another, got the wrong mother’s milk and was infected with hepatitis.

aanningA conscience-stricken surgeon in South Dakota has publicly confirmed one of the great frustrations for patients pursuing medical malpractice claims after they have been harmed: He says doctors are too willing to lie in court to protect themselves and colleagues, as he did two decades ago in a case involving a partner in his practice.

Dr. Lars Aanning says he no longer could live with his lie. Because he is 77, retired, and cannot be subject to colleagues’ retribution, he decided to ‘fess up, and to help attorneys who represent injured patients. Aanning says he does not know whether his false testimony was decisive in his partner’s lawsuit. But he confesses that he knew his colleague’s patient had suffered because of the treatment this stroke victim received. He also had had doubts before about his partner’s work.

He tells a reporter for Pro Publica, the Pulitzer Prize-winning online investigative site, that he knew at the moment he uttered his untruths that his lying flew in the face of everything he thought he stood for. But he says, “I did it as a matter of course. And I did it because there was a cultural attitude I was immersed in: You viewed all attorneys as a threat and anything that you did was OK to thwart their efforts to sue your colleagues. I just accepted that as normal. It wasn’t like, ‘I’m going to lie. It was, ‘I’m going to support my colleague.’ ”

ICUThe spots in hospitals where patients in the direst shape receive specialized treatment are themselves in need of urgent care, experts say, explaining that antiquated intensive care units (ICUs)

contribute to needless harm. But how exactly to yank them and the therapies they provide into the 21st century?

Usha Lee McFarling, a Pulitzer Prize winner, examines ICU reforms for the online health news site Stat, finding that these crucial and “heroic” hospital facilities fundamentally have changed little in a half century, although they now are jammed with new technology and devices. They serve almost 6 million Americans in grave condition, but in them, she says, “studies show serious and sometimes fatal medical errors are routine. And a recent review published in the journal Critical Care found no major advances in ICU care since the field’s inception in the 1960s.”

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information