Articles Posted in Insurance

AHCA-CBOAfter seven years, many dozens of repeal votes in Congress, and with the health of hundreds of millions of Americans at stake, can it be that the GOP’s plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act will come down to numbers?

The headlines about Obamacare’s potential replacement, the American Health Care Act, aka Trumpcare, may be rife with partisan politics. But after another helter-skelter week of attempted health care policy-making by Congress and the president, and with more crucial House action on tap in the days ahead, there’s lots of math that’s worth a review:

  • 14 million (2018), 21 million (2020), 24 million (2026)

ahca-300x169The president and his GOP allies on Capitol Hill already have rammed through two U.S. House committees a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. But to paraphrase a best-seller’s title, those who will be affected by the American Health Care Act, the AHCA, are from Earth, while the Republicans who are pushing Trumpcare must be from Pluto.

That’s because their Trumpcare, as evidence already has shown, will divide Americans as never before, while at the same time unifying them in opposition to it and disbelief about its current form.

Here’s what the suddenly engaged, now arm-twisting president Tweeted about the House legislation:  “Our wonderful new Healthcare Bill is now out for review and negotiation. ObamaCare is a complete and total disaster— is imploding fast!”

goodlatte-300x256We all know how con artists work the streets. One might bump into you in a train or in a crosswalk, while the other grabs your wallet. Or one might smile and chat with a mom at a playground, while her partner nabs the purse.

Patients and consumers may want to watch carefully for the congressional version of the distraction scam, a series of stealth bills that aim to strip them of valuable legal rights and protections they’ll need if harmed by big hospitals, rich doctors, big insurance companies, or giant corporations. With so much commotion under way with the new administration, Republicans sneakily have launched a furious, multi-pronged so-called “tort reform” campaign. They’ve wanted it for a long time. They insist it is needed to curb excess and frivolous lawsuits, to save money for Uncle Sam (who often is a defendant), to make the economy work better, and to add jobs, and to make life in general more wonderful.

Their arguments are counter-factual and lacking in evidence.

Congressional Republicans took their first break from Washington under the new Trump Administration. And those, like Sen. Tom Cotton, R.-Ark., who actually tried to  hear out constituents in town halls got caught in an angry backlash. Voters let their lawmakers know they were furious about GOP plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.

The electorate’s rising anger led to reports that the GOP, even in its hard-core House majority, might be jammed up in its long-pledged vow to immediately unwind Obamacare, especially how it added health insurance coverage for tens of millions of Americans, notably through an expansion of the Medicaid program. John Boehner, the former GOP House speaker, flatly proclaimed that his party would leave most of the ACA undisturbed.

ryanMembers of Congress are home in their districts for a week-long break, and many lawmakers are expected to get an earful from voters upset over many issues at the start of the Trump Administration, especially this: What the heck’s going on with health care?

Republicans have insisted for years now—counter-factually, as the evidence has amply demonstrated—that they had a cheaper, better, more inclusive alternative to the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. The promised to repeal the ACA on the day they gained control of Congress and the White House. That hasn’t happened. Nor has the GOP proffered its vaunted replacement. Instead, the party had talked in recent days about an ACA repair.

But under fire from their most conservative party members, Republican leaders have thrown up what they call an outline of Trumpcare. The GOP has moved from lots of R’s—repeal, replace, and repair—to some C’s and D’s: Costly, callous, divisive, and cruel. Those are some ways their retread plan elements (dubbed “déjà vu all over again” in one report) could be described. The outline still faces major challenges, not the least of which is whether a chaotic White House and a lumpen Congress can conduct the nation’s business and enact public policy.

thomas-price-225Republicans jammed through their health policy guru in the middle of the night, and they and their new HHS Secretary are still trying to figure out what to do with the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. Insurance markets are on the brink of chaos, and the mess is angering increasing number of Americans who may soon see their costs rise, their medical care decline, and their health imperiled.

The president and the speaker of the house continue to be at odds as to the timing of the GOP’s long-promised pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare, with the timeline stretching to the year’s end or beyond before the public gets to see the outlines or details of Republicans’ Trumpcare.

Proposals for ACA ‘repair’

Frank_luntz_2009-214x300With its furious attack on the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, has the GOP become the proverbial barking dog that finally caught the bus it has chased for so long? Partisans continue to proffer notions for what might be part of Trumpcare.

But for the R’s in the House and Senate who have insisted for seven years that they would swiftly repeal and replace Obamacare, two more R’s, uncomfortably, are intruding: Reality, and the new buzzword Repair.

The Trump Administration—no surprise—hasn’t provided details. But it  told the federal Office of Management and Budget that it soon will submit proposed regulations aimed at stabilizing health insurance markets during any Obamacare transition.

But why bother? That’s what some might think even once they know that today, January 31, is the absolute final day they can enroll in health insurance through the Affordable Care Act.

Yet even with an uncertain future for Obamacare, consumer advocates say the answer today is crystal clear:

Yes, you should sign up.

sen-collins-288x300Bill_Cassidy_headshot-237x300Will the partisans who promised and now can’t deliver on a blitzkrieg to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, end up deeply dividing the country in even more disturbing ways?

GOP leaders, after conceding that they cannot legislate their hoped-for Obamacare replacement until much later this year (reversing their pledge to do so on Day One of the new Administration), huddled in Philadelphia, nervously, to develop strategies and tactics. As they develop “Trumpcare,” they’re confronting growing and significant restiveness about the potential destructiveness of their current course, including the possibility their repeal may cost 43,000 American lives annually.

Meantime, the health care policy proposals that have floated up, including the Patient Freedom Act of 2017 from Republican senators Susan Collins of Maine and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, raise as many questions as they offer, including:

PE-Color-240x300As partisans race to fulfill their seven-year political pledge to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act, aka  Obamacare, their rhetoric has collided with reality, posing huge questions as to how responsibly they will act in the days ahead in regard to Americans’ health.

Curiously, the new president made no mention of health care in his inaugural address, and the White House web site, when it changed over, did not list this among top issues for the new administration.

But late Friday, President Trump signed an executive order, just several paragraphs long, that directed federal agencies to “waive, defer, grant exemptions from or delay” ACA rules — a move, symbolically if nothing else, to gut Obamacare, by undercutting, for example,  enforcement of its key requirement for Americans to carry health insurance or face penalties.

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