Articles Posted in Insurance

codes-300x220Hospital care accounts for a third of the nation’s $3 trillion in annual spending for medical services. And not only are these charges increasing—and driving up health costs—they’re infuriating patients and their families. Who can make heads or tails of hospital bills? And if consumers do, will they discover billing practices that only anger them more?

Elizabeth Rosenthal, a seasoned journalist, accomplished medical correspondent, and a non-practicing doctor, has created a stir with “An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back.” It’s her new best-seller, and was excerpted recently in the New York Times Magazine.

The book and magazine story delve, in part, into the sausage-making aspects of medical billing. These systems have enslaved American health care. They turn on bulky, balky coding systems that provide a short-hand summary for every therapy that patients receive from providers—physicians and hospitals. In turn, payers—patients, insurers, and Uncle Sam—rely on the codes to determine fees they will fork over for services and materials. In between are platoons of coders and billing experts for payers and providers, warring over ever number and the money they represent.

popularOcareRepublicans in Congress are heading home to their districts for a spring break. Will they hear again from angry constituents—but this time from zealous supporters angry that they failed to fulfill their seven-year promise to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act aka Obamacare?

Maybe, maybe not. It seems the House GOP, especially, has remedied one of President Obama’s notable shortcomings: Republicans have churned through the ACA so thoroughly and publicly that they have convinced Americans that Obamacare’s pretty good.

It’s polling more strongly than ever, hitting a peak 55 percent approval rating. Americans say they want politicians to improve the existing ACA, not replace it with the failed American Health Care Act, aka Trumpcare.

vox-300x255Now that the blitzkrieg assault on Obamacare is over, the battle to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act hasn’t gone totally up in smoke. It just has fallen, for now, into lots of still critical bits and pieces.

Keep your eye on:

Medicaid

Donald_Trump-1-225x300A GOP assault on American health care has been turned aside, for now. But major questions have been exposed that will need answering if we as a country are ever to come together over health care. Do we recognize that health care—comprising 17.5 percent of the Gross Domestic Product and trillions of dollars in spending annually— has become so costly, complicated, and critical that each of us, at some point in our lives, must have some assistance from all the rest of the collective us?

In short: Do we believe that health care is a right?

All other civilized countries answered that question long ago in the affirmative and have implemented systems that guarantee everyone living within their borders (or even visitors from places like the USA) a basic package of health care.  But we here in the United States still struggle with the world’s most expensive health care system that delivers care to a smaller percentage of its residents than anywhere else and that gets worse outcomes than most other advanced countries.

AHCA-CBOAfter seven years, many dozens of repeal votes in Congress, and with the health of hundreds of millions of Americans at stake, can it be that the GOP’s plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act will come down to numbers?

The headlines about Obamacare’s potential replacement, the American Health Care Act, aka Trumpcare, may be rife with partisan politics. But after another helter-skelter week of attempted health care policy-making by Congress and the president, and with more crucial House action on tap in the days ahead, there’s lots of math that’s worth a review:

  • 14 million (2018), 21 million (2020), 24 million (2026)

ahca-300x169The president and his GOP allies on Capitol Hill already have rammed through two U.S. House committees a plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. But to paraphrase a best-seller’s title, those who will be affected by the American Health Care Act, the AHCA, are from Earth, while the Republicans who are pushing Trumpcare must be from Pluto.

That’s because their Trumpcare, as evidence already has shown, will divide Americans as never before, while at the same time unifying them in opposition to it and disbelief about its current form.

Here’s what the suddenly engaged, now arm-twisting president Tweeted about the House legislation:  “Our wonderful new Healthcare Bill is now out for review and negotiation. ObamaCare is a complete and total disaster— is imploding fast!”

goodlatte-300x256We all know how con artists work the streets. One might bump into you in a train or in a crosswalk, while the other grabs your wallet. Or one might smile and chat with a mom at a playground, while her partner nabs the purse.

Patients and consumers may want to watch carefully for the congressional version of the distraction scam, a series of stealth bills that aim to strip them of valuable legal rights and protections they’ll need if harmed by big hospitals, rich doctors, big insurance companies, or giant corporations. With so much commotion under way with the new administration, Republicans sneakily have launched a furious, multi-pronged so-called “tort reform” campaign. They’ve wanted it for a long time. They insist it is needed to curb excess and frivolous lawsuits, to save money for Uncle Sam (who often is a defendant), to make the economy work better, and to add jobs, and to make life in general more wonderful.

Their arguments are counter-factual and lacking in evidence.

Congressional Republicans took their first break from Washington under the new Trump Administration. And those, like Sen. Tom Cotton, R.-Ark., who actually tried to  hear out constituents in town halls got caught in an angry backlash. Voters let their lawmakers know they were furious about GOP plans to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare.

The electorate’s rising anger led to reports that the GOP, even in its hard-core House majority, might be jammed up in its long-pledged vow to immediately unwind Obamacare, especially how it added health insurance coverage for tens of millions of Americans, notably through an expansion of the Medicaid program. John Boehner, the former GOP House speaker, flatly proclaimed that his party would leave most of the ACA undisturbed.

ryanMembers of Congress are home in their districts for a week-long break, and many lawmakers are expected to get an earful from voters upset over many issues at the start of the Trump Administration, especially this: What the heck’s going on with health care?

Republicans have insisted for years now—counter-factually, as the evidence has amply demonstrated—that they had a cheaper, better, more inclusive alternative to the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare. The promised to repeal the ACA on the day they gained control of Congress and the White House. That hasn’t happened. Nor has the GOP proffered its vaunted replacement. Instead, the party had talked in recent days about an ACA repair.

But under fire from their most conservative party members, Republican leaders have thrown up what they call an outline of Trumpcare. The GOP has moved from lots of R’s—repeal, replace, and repair—to some C’s and D’s: Costly, callous, divisive, and cruel. Those are some ways their retread plan elements (dubbed “déjà vu all over again” in one report) could be described. The outline still faces major challenges, not the least of which is whether a chaotic White House and a lumpen Congress can conduct the nation’s business and enact public policy.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information