Articles Posted in Heart Disease

Mick_Mulvaney_Official_Portrait_113th_Congress_cropped-249x300The  Trump budget for the federal government would be a huge step back from investment in medical research with consequences for many years in progress on promoting health and fighting disease.

The budget announcement, tilted so far toward guns over butter, proved so challenging to even members of Trump’s own controlling party that lawmakers hastened to underscore that Congress, and not the chief executive, theoretically, holds  the nation’s purse strings.

The president would boost allocations for the military by more than $50 billion, and significantly increase spending for homeland security, with billions for his proposed border wall as well as more customs and immigration agents nationwide. He would gut almost 80 federal programs, providing support for everything from the arts and public broadcasting to home weatherization, rural economic development, legal services for the poor, and meals on wheels food services for the old and sick.

QCBFL_-_Snow_Game_2011_Vander_Veer_Park_Davenport_Iowa-300x200Get up. Move. Pace. Walk around the block. Swim some laps at the Y. Hit the greens over the weekend, go dancing on Friday night, or jump into Saturday or Sunday games of touch football or pickup basketball. Exercise needn’t be strenuous to benefit your health and well-being in many ways, research continues to confirm. With a new year under way and lots going on for so many of us, activity also can play a significant role in diminishing the harms of stress.

The New York Times has put out pertinent stories on how:

  • Exercise, even a gentle walk around the block — yes, with a two- or four-footed eager companion — can improve people’s moods, making them happier.

obamacare-cartoon-2-a-300x240As the already known complications to its demise have increased by the minute, there may be some detectable pauses in the partisan zeal to give the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, the bum’s rush. That’s because the legislation’s repeal-and-replace proponents — despite seven years and several dozen U.S. House votes  to roll back the ACA — have yet to detail how 20 million Americans who have gotten health insurance under Obamacare will be covered in the days ahead.

Opponents also haven’t explained how they may change the far reach of the ACA, including how the law and the Obama administration have reshaped, and often, improved American health care, for example, by changing entrenched payment practices and forcing greater accountability.

The New York Times, in reviewing the presidential legacy, has reported on what it terms the transformational aspects of Obamacare that also may sustain, no matter the partisan attacks on the attempt to provide broader health insurance coverage. In brief, the paper says Obamacare forced health care in this country to become more data-driven and evidence-based, as well as refocused on patients and their needs. Although some of the major drivers of these reforms, including hefty spending for electronic health records, haven’t hit the high marks advocates hoped for, progress has occurred.

money-300x193What if you bought the hottest car around, only to find a neighbor found a model just as sporty and paid much less? How would you react if you opened your credit card bill and learned that the family budget was in tatters because your daughter commuted a few blocks to school by taxi, and your son had racked up huge charges for junky electronic gadgets and questionable movies online? Your consternation would be a tiny fraction of the great concern that most of us should experience due to a new study that finds that Americans spent $3.2 trillion on health care in 2014.

If you’re like me, when figures get that big, they become hard to grasp. But for comparison’s sake, the United States’ medical spending  exceeded the 2015 gross domestic product (the monetary value of all the finished goods and services produced within a given country’s borders in a specific time period) for the economies of: Britain, France, Canada, Russia, Italy, Mexico, Indonesia, Australia, South Korea, Spain, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and the Netherlands.

Americans spent more on back and neck pain than Russia did on its military and national defense.

cdc death causesImportant indicators about Americans’ health and well-being are trending the wrong way: For the first time in almost a quarter century, the nation’s life expectancy has declined.  Meantime, fatal overdoses by Americans taking opioid drugs continued to surge and exceeded 30,000 in 2015. And abuse of heroin has exceeded that of traditional prescription painkillers, with deaths due to heroin-related causes surpassing gun homicides.

Experts were surprised by the life expectancy decline, which reflected an increase in eight of the top 10 causes of death (see figure right from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics) including heart disease, diabetes and kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s—but not cancer.

It may be a statistical blip from one particularly bad year. The last time a comparable dip occurred was in 1993 due to high rates of deaths from HIV-AIDS, flu, homicides, and accidental deaths. Some experts said the decline in life expectancy, which for men fell on average in years from 78.9 to 78.8, may be attributable to increasing issues with Americans and obesity, and health care hitting limits on progress against heart disease.

NL_DifferenceThere’s  more encouraging news about dementia rates, which a new study has found fell 24 percent between 2000 and 2012, decreasing among Americans 65 and older from 11.6 percent to 8.8 percent. The experts aren’t sure why the rates declined. But it means that 1.5 million or so seniors will be spared the severe cognitive declines that would have been expected from earlier rates of the tragic disease.

Researchers, who published their latest findings in the peer reviewed and respected Journal of the American Medical Association, said that greater educational attainment and improved heart health may have led to the decreases in the prevalence of the condition associated with loss of memory or other mental abilities so severe it interferes with daily life. Alzheimer’s disease is most commonly linked to dementia. Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia and occurs after a stroke.

The new study, funded by the National Institutes of Health and on Aging (NIH and NIA), produced continuing surprises as experts have projected an explosion in cases among Americans, who are increasingly gray, obese, and diabetic—factors that significantly increase dementia risks.

1024px-Heart_anterior_exterior_viewHeart health news grabbed a lot of headlines in recent days, especially as experts gathered for a major national conference in New Orleans. But skeptical readers would do well to scrutinize the reports on topics like: who should take statins, what’s the role of lifestyle and genetics in heart disease, and how heart-safe is a well-known pain and inflammation medication?

U.S. task force issues new statin guidelines

Let’s start with the new recommendations on statins from the well-respected U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The independent, influential advisory group—which sorts through research and seeks to offer authoritative, unbiased guidance about medical services and practices—said Americans 40 to 75 with no history of cardiovascular disease but certain risk factors might consider taking statins. The risk factors include whether they have high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes or smoking. The panel said that puts them at a 10 percent or greater risk of having a heart attack or stroke in the next 10 years.

Women-Heart-AttackHas a colleague really gotten under your skin? Has your boss popped off at you in a way that crosses your line? Have your spouse or kids run up big bills, banged up a car, or gotten in trouble in a way that just infuriates you? Go ahead, pull on the running shoes, and exercise a bit to blow off the steam. But be careful if you’re so angry that you push yourself beyond your normal limits.

That’s because Canadian researchers, working with global data, have determined that anger or emotional upset just before vigorous exercise more than doubled the risk of people suffering a first heart attack. If individuals performed heavy physical activity, they more than tripled their heart attack risk.

The results were based on information on 12,500 men and women from 52 nations who were examined and interviewed at 262 health centers. Researchers were trying to understand their emotions and activity before their first heart attacks, they reported in the peer-reviewed and well-respected medical journal Circulation.

Just some quick updates on some topics that the blog has followed in recent days:

Big Soda, Big Pharma spending big to battle ballot measures

heatercoolerPost-op heart surgery patients who experience night sweats, muscle aches, weight loss, fatigue, or unexplained fever should contact their doctors, stat, federal officials say. They’re warning that a medical device, designed to keep organs and blood at a constant temperature, was contaminated with nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM). Officials already have confirmed more than two dozen NTM infections in open heart patients, and thousands more may be at risk.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention flagged the potential patient risks linked to the Stöckert 3T, temperature-regulating surgical devices made by LivaNova PLC (formerly Sorin Group Deutschland GmbH).

Temperature-regulating devices are common in the 250,000 open heart surgeries performed annually in hospitals, officials say, and 60 percent of the procedures involve the German-made model. NTM infections may not develop immediately, and some cases were confirmed as many as four years after surgery. They typically are not fatal but can be problematic for immune-compromised patients, such as many open heart patients are. They respond well to antibiotics if detected.

Patrick Malone & Associates, P.C. listed in Best Lawyers Rated by Super Lawyers Patrick A. Malone
Washingtonian Top Lawyer 2011
Avvo Rating 10.0 Superb Top Attorney Best Lawyers Firm
Contact Information